Conspiracy theories and conspiracy theorising

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    102 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    The dismissive attitude of intellectuals toward conspiracy theorists is considered and given some justification. It is argued that intellectuals are entitled to an attitude of prima facie skepticism toward the theories propounded by conspiracy theorists, because conspiracy theorists have an irrational tendency to continue to believe in conspiracy theories, even when these take on the appearance of forming the core of degenerating research program. It is further argued that the pervasive effect of the 'fundamental attribution error' can explain the behavior of such conspiracy theorists. A rival approach due to Brian Keeley, which involves the criticism of a subclass of conspiracy theories on epistemic grounds, is considered and found to be inadequate.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)131-150
    Number of pages20
    JournalPhilosophy of the Social Sciences
    Volume32
    Issue number2
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Jun 2002

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