Corporate social responsibility: Beyond the business case to human rights

Thomas Campbell

    Research output: Book chapter/Published conference paperChapter (peer-reviewed)

    10 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    The relationship between business and human rights has emerged in the last two decades as one of the most pressing issues in the field of business ethics. Do corporations have human rights responsibilities? If so, what is the nature of those responsibilities and do they differ in any significant way from those of governments? Is it reasonable or realistic to expect corporations to respect human rights in environments where governments, particularly in the developing and underdeveloped world, need economic development and have a limited capacity and/or interest in enforcing human rights standards and laws? The contributors to this groundbreaking volume take up these questions, examining them from both theoretical and practical perspectives.Topics discussed include the debates leading to the creation of the ISO 26000 standard and the United Nations human rights framework for business entities, as well as the nature and limits of the human rights responsibilities of business, the roles and responsibilities of international trade bodies like the World Trade Organization in protecting human rights, and the implications of the current debate for international trade agreements and trade with China. The contributors also explore the effectiveness of voluntary human rights standards in the textile and clothing trade, mining, advertising and the pharmaceutical industries.
    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationBusiness and human rights
    EditorsWesley Cragg
    Place of PublicationCheltenham
    PublisherEdward Elgar Publishing
    Chapter2
    Pages47-73
    Number of pages27
    ISBN (Electronic)9781781005774
    ISBN (Print)9781781005767
    Publication statusPublished - 2012

    Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Corporate social responsibility: Beyond the business case to human rights'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this

    Campbell, T. (2012). Corporate social responsibility: Beyond the business case to human rights. In W. Cragg (Ed.), Business and human rights (pp. 47-73). Edward Elgar Publishing.