Cultural responsiveness and social work: a discussion

Sue Green, Bindi Bennett, Sonia Betteridge

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This paper uses a critical framework to discuss the importance of culturally responsive practice when working with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander individuals and communities. Critical social work aims to critique and dismantle the societal structures that create oppression and inequalities for powerless groups of people within society. The social work profession will be used to illustrate the importance of culturally responsive practice, as it attempts to ensure that its practice is culturally safe with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and communities. This article explores cultural responsiveness through three auto-ethnographies from both non-Aboriginal and Aboriginal perspectives that are highly applicable to a range of professions.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)66-72
Number of pages8
JournalSocial Alternatives
Volume35
Issue number4
Publication statusPublished - 2017

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