"DANMM that’s good!”: Evaluating the feasibility and acceptability of the Deadly Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Nursing and Midwifery Mentoring (DANMM) Program across rural, regional, and metropolitan NSW. The journey so far…

Jessica Biles, Angela Damm, Peter Fernando, Troy Pietsch, Brett Biles, Judith Anderson, Faye McMillan AM, Tara Flemington, Nathaniel Alexander, Grant Sara, Christian Bradley, Rebecca Willis, Shanna Fealy, Nicolle Davies, Jane Havelka

Research output: Other contribution to conferenceAbstractpeer-review

Abstract

Title: “DANMM that’s good!”: Evaluating the feasibility and acceptability of the Deadly Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Nursing and Midwifery Mentoring (DANMM) Program across rural, regional, and metropolitan NSW. The journey so far…
Presenters: Ms Angela Damm & Dr Jessica Biles
Research team: Peter Fernando, Dr Jessica Biles, Troy Pietsch, Associate Professor Brett Biles, Professor Fay McMillan, Associate Professor Judith Anderson, Dr Tara Flemington, Nathaniel Alexander, Professor Grant Sara, Dr Bradley Christian, Dr Shanna Fealy, Charmaine Marshall, Angela Damm, Rebecca Willis, Nicolle Davies, and Dr Jane Havelka.
Background: Recruitment and retention challenges related to Aboriginal nurses and midwives are recognised as a major challenge. Research suggests they are caused by high levels of individual racism and low levels of cultural safety (Usher, et al, 2005; Lai, et al, 2018; Biles et al, 2022) leading to low workplace satisfaction levels. Culturally specific mentoring programs are seen to support workforce retention for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander nurses and midwives and facilitate workforce growth (Commonwealth of Australia, 2019; Gwynne & Lincoln, 2017). However, mentoring frameworks are yet to be empirically evaluated (Fedele, 2019).
Aim: The “Deadly Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Nursing and Midwifery Mentoring (DANMM) Program is an Aboriginal designed and led program aimed to support workforce retention. We currently have no indicators on what is considered a culturally safe workplace for NSW Aboriginal nurses and midwives. DANMM aims to provide NSW health a footprint on what constitutes a culturally safe workplace.
Methods: The DANMM feasibility study, through quantitative and qualitative methodology aims to address research questions that will yield positive cultural capability impacts across nursing and midwifery workforce in the five participating LHD’ through three key measures. The Nursing Workplace Satisfaction Questionnaire will assess whether a cultural mentoring program moves the level of satisfaction and retention of Aboriginal nurses and midwives.
Conclusion: With nurses and midwives comprising 57% of the overall health workforce, this project will impact the overall cultural capability of the nursing and midwifery workforce in the five participating local heath districts.
References:
Bailey, J., Blignault, I., Carriage, C., Demasi, K., Joseph, T., Kelleher, K., Lew Fatt, E., Meyer, L., Naden, P., Nathan, S., Newman, J., Renata, P., Ridoutt, L., Stanford, D. & Williams, M, (2020). ‘We Are working for our people’: Growing and strengthening the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health workforce, Career Pathways Project Report, The Lowitja Institute, Melbourne.
Biles, J., Deravin, L., Seaman, C. E., Alexander, N., Damm, A., & Trudgett, N. (2021). Learnings from a mentoring project to support Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander nurses and midwives to remain in the workforce. Contemporary Nurse, 1–11. doi:10.1080/10376178.2021.1991412
Commonwealth of Australia, Department of Health (2014). Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Curriculum Framework, Commonwealth of Australia, Canberra.
Fedele, R (2019). Mentoring matters [online]. Australian Nursing and Midwifery Journal, Vol. 26, No. 6: 10-12.
Lai, G. C., Taylor, E. V., Haigh, M. M., & Thompson, S. C. (2018). Factors affecting the retention of Indigenous Australians in the health workforce: a systematic review. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 15(5).
Usher, K., Miller, M., Turale, S. T., & Goold, S. (2005). Meeting the challenges of recruitment and retention of Indigenous people into nursing: outcomes of the Indigenous Nurse Education Working Group. Collegian Journal of the Royal College of Nursing Australia, 12(3), p. 27.

Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - 28 Apr 2023
EventASMIRT 2023 Conference - International Convention Centre, Sydney, Australia
Duration: 27 Apr 202330 Apr 2023
https://conference.asmirt.org/2023/
https://conference.asmirt.org/2023/wp-content/uploads/2023/05/ASMIRT-2023-program-FINAL-V8.pdf (Program)
https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/toc/20513909/2023/70/S1 (Abstracts)

Conference

ConferenceASMIRT 2023 Conference
Abbreviated titleChampions of change. Honouring the past, embracing the present, shaping the future
Country/TerritoryAustralia
CitySydney
Period27/04/2330/04/23
OtherThe theme for this year’s Conference is Champions of change – Honouring the past | Embracing the present | Shaping the future.

We are looking for you, our current and future champions, to submit workshop proposals and abstracts. The conference will comprise an engaging program including a mixture of invited speakers, proffered papers, vibrant physical posters, specialised workshops and so much more.

Honour the past by sharing previous learnings and knowledge and how they still relate to current practice
Embrace the present by networking, collaborating and reconnecting with your peers and others in the profession
Shape the future by sharing your latest research and workplace protocols, professional standards and ongoing improvement of practice and person centred care across our profession.
Internet address

Grant Number

  • H22/4011
  • 0000103865

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