Determining the quality of diets of grazing animals

Gaye Krebs, M.B.P. Kumara Mahipala, P. McCafferty, K. Dods

Research output: Book chapter/Published conference paperConference paper

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Abstract

Predicting growth rates or determining the needs for supplementary feeding of grazing animals requires knowledge of the nutritive value of the diet the animals are consuming. Faecal analyses are non-invasive and effective methods for compiling information about the diets of animals. In this study the usefulness of faecal chemistry and near infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS), either used individually or in combination to predict the quality of mixed diets fed to sheep was investigated. Faecal nitrogen, ash, neutral detergent fibre and lignin contents can be successfully used to predict the metabolisable energy content and the organic matter digestibility of the diet as well as the type of rumen fermentation (in terms of short chain fatty acids) whilst fNIRS calibration equations can be successfully used to predict the crude protein, total phenolic and total tannins contents of mixed diets consumed by sheep.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication25th Annual Conference
Subtitle of host publicationAdapting mixed farms to future environments
EditorsCathy Waters, Denys Garden
Place of PublicationOrange, NSW Australia
PublisherThe Grassland Society of NSW Inc.
Pages80-84
Number of pages5
ISBN (Electronic)9781742560311
Publication statusPublished - 2010
EventThe Grassland Society of NSW Annual Conference - Dubbo, NSW, Australia
Duration: 28 Jul 201029 Jul 2010

Conference

ConferenceThe Grassland Society of NSW Annual Conference
CountryAustralia
Period28/07/1029/07/10

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    Krebs, G., Kumara Mahipala, M. B. P., McCafferty, P., & Dods, K. (2010). Determining the quality of diets of grazing animals. In C. Waters, & D. Garden (Eds.), 25th Annual Conference: Adapting mixed farms to future environments (pp. 80-84). The Grassland Society of NSW Inc..