Diagnosing Dementia in Rural New South Wales

Patricia A. Logan-Sinclair, Alistair Davison

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)
20 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Objective: Review of dementia screening case profiles that included brain blood flow imaging to determine contribution to diagnosis.Design: retrospective medical case audit.Setting: rural NSW.Participants: 88 rural patients who underwent investigations for dementia diagnosis.Main outcome measure: contribution of brain blood flow imaging (SPECT) to the dementia screening regime.Results: The age range of those referred was 21 to 88 years, the average being 70 years. There were 44 men and 44 women. Vascular causes of dementia accounted for 27% of all those referred for brain blood imaging. Senile Dementia of the Alzheimer’s Type (SDAT) accounted for 40% of all referrals. The occurrence of mixed disease was 6%. Matching neuropsychological reports and computer tomography (CT) were available for 18 of the blood flow studies. Of these, 65% were in agreement or semi-agreement for the diagnostic outcome. Only five studies failed to reach consensus. General practitioners were responsible for 31% of the imaging referrals, the remaining referrals were from the regions two gerontologists, three physicians and two neurologists.Conclusions: Brain blood flow imaging did contribute to the final diagnosis of dementia type for these patients influencing patient management.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)183-188
Number of pages6
JournalAustralian Journal of Rural Health
Volume15
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2007

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New South Wales
Dementia
Referral and Consultation
Brain
Medical Audit
Vascular Dementia
Single-Photon Emission-Computed Tomography
Neuroimaging
General Practitioners
Consensus
Alzheimer Disease
Tomography
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Physicians

Cite this

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abstract = "Objective: Review of dementia screening case profiles that included brain blood flow imaging to determine contribution to diagnosis.Design: retrospective medical case audit.Setting: rural NSW.Participants: 88 rural patients who underwent investigations for dementia diagnosis.Main outcome measure: contribution of brain blood flow imaging (SPECT) to the dementia screening regime.Results: The age range of those referred was 21 to 88 years, the average being 70 years. There were 44 men and 44 women. Vascular causes of dementia accounted for 27{\%} of all those referred for brain blood imaging. Senile Dementia of the Alzheimer’s Type (SDAT) accounted for 40{\%} of all referrals. The occurrence of mixed disease was 6{\%}. Matching neuropsychological reports and computer tomography (CT) were available for 18 of the blood flow studies. Of these, 65{\%} were in agreement or semi-agreement for the diagnostic outcome. Only five studies failed to reach consensus. General practitioners were responsible for 31{\%} of the imaging referrals, the remaining referrals were from the regions two gerontologists, three physicians and two neurologists.Conclusions: Brain blood flow imaging did contribute to the final diagnosis of dementia type for these patients influencing patient management.",
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Diagnosing Dementia in Rural New South Wales. / Logan-Sinclair, Patricia A.; Davison, Alistair.

In: Australian Journal of Rural Health, Vol. 15, No. 3, 2007, p. 183-188.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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