Diagnostic cues in major crime investigation

Ben Morrison, Natalie M.V. Morrison

Research output: Book chapter/Published conference paperChapter (peer-reviewed)peer-review

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Decision-making, or the process by which a decision is formulated, can be described as a subset of an individual's information processing capacity (Howell & Fleishman, 1982; Lehto & Nah, 2006; Wickens & Flach, 1988; Wickens & Hollands, 2000). Information processing generally involves the acquisition of information, the encoding ofinformation, the recall ofinformation from memory, and the integration of this information to establish a mental representation or an internal explanation or model for how something operates within the external world (Wickens & Flach, 1988). According to Wickens and Hollands (2000), information processing is involved at three key stages of the decision-making process.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationDiagnostic expertise in organizational environments
EditorsMark W. Wiggins, Thomas Loveday
Place of PublicationSurrey, England
PublisherAshgate Publishing Limited
Chapter9
Pages91-98
Number of pages8
ISBN (Electronic)9781472435187
ISBN (Print)9781472435170
Publication statusPublished - 2015

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