Dissecting normalcy: Ideology, Ecology and Society

Ben Stahnke, Taylor Genovese, Joshua Hodges, Christian Noakes, Thomas Joyce, Talia Lux, Ethan Deere

Research output: Book chapter/Published conference paperConference paperpeer-review

Abstract

A CCS panel talk delivered to the 2021 Southwestern Humanities Symposium—a graduate student conference held February 26-27 at Arizona State University. This year's conference revolved around themes of normalcy and un/non/dis/abnormalcy.

Listen in as six of our CCS research fellows and Peace, Land, & Bread editors talk about the intersection of normalcy and ideology, ecology, and society, demonstrating how Marxist theory works to dissect normalcy, and to uncover the material bases of ideological and superstructural norms.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the ASU Symposium
Publication statusPublished - 2021
EventSouthwest Humanities Symposium 2021 - Online
Duration: 26 Feb 202127 Feb 2021
https://asuevents.asu.edu/content/southwest-humanities-symposium-2021
https://call-for-papers.sas.upenn.edu/cfp/2020/10/29/southwest-humanities-symposium-2021-normalcy-and-unnondisabnormalcy (Call for papers)

Seminar

SeminarSouthwest Humanities Symposium 2021
Abbreviated titleNormalcy and Un/non/dis/abnormalcy
Period26/02/2127/02/21
OtherThe Southwest Humanities Symposium is a regional, interdisciplinary conference held annually at Arizona State University. The conference provides graduate and advanced undergraduate students with an opportunity to present original scholarship before an interdisciplinary audience.

Graduate students at all levels across all programs can apply, so long as their work is related to our theme and humanities writ large. All sessions will be online and there is no registration fee!

The theme for 2021 is Normalcy and Un/non/dis/abnormalcy.

The Southwest Humanities Symposium is hosted by the Graduate Scholars of English Association (GSEA) with support from the Department of English at ASU.
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