Disturbance governs dominance of an invasive forb in a temporary wetland

J. N. Price, P. J. Berney, D. Ryder, R. D. B. Whalley, C. L. Gross

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Dominance of invasive species is often assumed to be due to a superior ability to acquire resources. However, dominance in plant communities can arise through multiple interacting mechanisms, including disturbance. Inter-specific competition can be strongly affected by abiotic conditions, which can determine the outcome of competitive interactions. We evaluated competition and disturbance as mechanisms governing dominance of Phyla canescens (hereafter lippia), an invasive perennial forb from South America, in Paspalum distichum (perennial grass, hereafter water couch) meadows in floodplain wetlands of eastern Australia.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)759-769
Number of pages11
JournalOecologia
Volume167
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2011

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Phyla canescens
wetlands
Paspalum distichum
Paspalum scrobiculatum
wetland
Lippia
disturbance
interspecific competition
invasive species
floodplains
meadow
meadows
floodplain
plant community
plant communities
grass
grasses
resource
water
South America

Cite this

Price, J. N., Berney, P. J., Ryder, D., Whalley, R. D. B., & Gross, C. L. (2011). Disturbance governs dominance of an invasive forb in a temporary wetland. Oecologia, 167(3), 759-769. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00442-011-2027-8
Price, J. N. ; Berney, P. J. ; Ryder, D. ; Whalley, R. D. B. ; Gross, C. L. / Disturbance governs dominance of an invasive forb in a temporary wetland. In: Oecologia. 2011 ; Vol. 167, No. 3. pp. 759-769.
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Price, JN, Berney, PJ, Ryder, D, Whalley, RDB & Gross, CL 2011, 'Disturbance governs dominance of an invasive forb in a temporary wetland', Oecologia, vol. 167, no. 3, pp. 759-769. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00442-011-2027-8

Disturbance governs dominance of an invasive forb in a temporary wetland. / Price, J. N.; Berney, P. J.; Ryder, D.; Whalley, R. D. B.; Gross, C. L.

In: Oecologia, Vol. 167, No. 3, 2011, p. 759-769.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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