Diversity health: Emancipatory pedagogy and community cultural development: A case study: Cardiac storyboards from Prince of Wales Hospital, Sydney

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    Abstract

    This paper reports on a pilot study investigating communication practices and patient involvement in their health care from a community cultural development and person-centred care perspective. The study postulates that good patient-clinician communication practices reduce misunderstandings, clarify expectations, enable accurate diagnosing and clinical management, avoid patient complaints, promise better long-term outcomes, and prevent adverse events. Effective and culturally responsive communication practices enable patients to become involved, ask questions and take responsibility in their health care. The approach to cardiac rehabilitation presented in this paper privileges person-centred knowledge by engaging with patient stories, professional and community cultures, uncertainties and ambiguities of the inexact sciences of communication practice in health service provision. It concludes by encouraging clinicians to question and emancipate themselves from organisational or professional settings that privileges didactic communication, biomedical aspects and medical knowledge.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)32-36
    Number of pages5
    JournalAlice: Magazine
    Volume10
    Issue numbern/a
    Publication statusPublished - 2005

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