Does knowing overcome wanting? The impact of consumer knowledge and materialism on credit card selection with young consumers

Jakob Carkins, Steven D'Alessandro

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose--This paper investigates the determinants of credit card use and misuse by student and young professionals. Critical to the research is the impact of materialism and knowledge on selection of the appropriate credit card. Design/methodology/approach--This study uses survey research and partial least squares to investigate credit card behaviors of students versus young professionals. Findings--In a comparative study of young professionals and students, it was found that consumer knowledge, as expected, leads to better consumer selection of credit cards. Materialism was also found to increase the motivation for more optimal consumer outcomes. For more experienced consumers, such as young professionals, it was found that despite them being more knowledgeable, they were more likely to select a credit card based on impulse. Originality/value--This paper examines how materialism may in fact encourage some consumers to make better decisions because they are more motivated to develop better knowledge. It also shows how better credit card selection may inhibit impulse purchasing.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)50-70
Number of pages21
JournalYoung Consumers
Volume16
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015

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