Dual-purpose crops

Comparison of maternal systems grazing canola or wheat during late pregnancy and lambing then lucerne-based pasture until weaning

Research output: Book chapter/Published conference paperConference paper

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Abstract

Dual-purpose crops can reduce winter feed gaps and allow an increase in farm stocking rates on mixed farms.This study sought to compare the effect of inclusion of dual-purpose crops on livestock systemsproducing meat only compared with a system producing meat and wool. Six plots (1.86ha) were sown toeither dual-purpose wheat or canola in April 2014 in a replicated design. White Dorper ewes joined to eitherWhite Suffolk (WSD) or White Dorper (Dorper) rams, and Merino ewes joined to White Suffolk (WSM)rams were scanned in lamb on 15 May and allocated to plots on 19 June at a stocking rate of 13 ewes/ha,with a minimum of six ewes of each genotype per plot. Lambing commenced on 13 July and lamb birth weights were recorded. Ewes and lambs grazed lucerne-based pasture from 12 August until weaning on 29 September when all ewes and lambs were weighed. Crude protein levels were initially higher in wheat, but were lower at the conclusion of grazing; digestibility was initially similar between crops but declined in wheat during the grazing period; and NDF was always lower in canola compared to wheat (all P<0.001). Ewe liveweights were significantly (P<0.001) heavier when grazing wheat compared to canola at the end of crop grazing, but there was no significant difference at weaning. The interaction of crop and lamb genotype was significant for lamb weaning weights (P=0.027) with White Dorper lambs from the wheat treatments being significantly lighter than from the canola treatment.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication17th Proceedings of the Australian Agronomy Conference
Subtitle of host publicationBuilding productive, diverse and sustainable landscapes
Place of PublicationAustralia
PublisherAustralian Society of Agronomy
Pages765-771
Number of pages7
Publication statusPublished - 2015
EventAustralian Agronomy Conference - Wrest Point Convention Centre, Hobart, Australia
Duration: 21 Sep 201524 Sep 2015
http://2015.agronomyconference.com/

Conference

ConferenceAustralian Agronomy Conference
Abbreviated titleBuilding Productive, Diverse and Sustainable Landscapes
CountryAustralia
CityHobart
Period21/09/1524/09/15
Internet address

Fingerprint

lambing
canola
alfalfa
ewes
weaning
lambs
pastures
pregnancy
grazing
wheat
Dorper
crops
Suffolk (sheep breed)
rams
stocking rate
meat
farms
genotype
weaning weight
Merino

Cite this

McGrath, S., & Friend, M. (2015). Dual-purpose crops: Comparison of maternal systems grazing canola or wheat during late pregnancy and lambing then lucerne-based pasture until weaning. In 17th Proceedings of the Australian Agronomy Conference: Building productive, diverse and sustainable landscapes (pp. 765-771). Australia: Australian Society of Agronomy.
McGrath, Shawn ; Friend, Michael. / Dual-purpose crops : Comparison of maternal systems grazing canola or wheat during late pregnancy and lambing then lucerne-based pasture until weaning. 17th Proceedings of the Australian Agronomy Conference: Building productive, diverse and sustainable landscapes. Australia : Australian Society of Agronomy, 2015. pp. 765-771
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abstract = "Dual-purpose crops can reduce winter feed gaps and allow an increase in farm stocking rates on mixed farms.This study sought to compare the effect of inclusion of dual-purpose crops on livestock systemsproducing meat only compared with a system producing meat and wool. Six plots (1.86ha) were sown toeither dual-purpose wheat or canola in April 2014 in a replicated design. White Dorper ewes joined to eitherWhite Suffolk (WSD) or White Dorper (Dorper) rams, and Merino ewes joined to White Suffolk (WSM)rams were scanned in lamb on 15 May and allocated to plots on 19 June at a stocking rate of 13 ewes/ha,with a minimum of six ewes of each genotype per plot. Lambing commenced on 13 July and lamb birth weights were recorded. Ewes and lambs grazed lucerne-based pasture from 12 August until weaning on 29 September when all ewes and lambs were weighed. Crude protein levels were initially higher in wheat, but were lower at the conclusion of grazing; digestibility was initially similar between crops but declined in wheat during the grazing period; and NDF was always lower in canola compared to wheat (all P<0.001). Ewe liveweights were significantly (P<0.001) heavier when grazing wheat compared to canola at the end of crop grazing, but there was no significant difference at weaning. The interaction of crop and lamb genotype was significant for lamb weaning weights (P=0.027) with White Dorper lambs from the wheat treatments being significantly lighter than from the canola treatment.",
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McGrath, S & Friend, M 2015, Dual-purpose crops: Comparison of maternal systems grazing canola or wheat during late pregnancy and lambing then lucerne-based pasture until weaning. in 17th Proceedings of the Australian Agronomy Conference: Building productive, diverse and sustainable landscapes. Australian Society of Agronomy, Australia, pp. 765-771, Australian Agronomy Conference, Hobart, Australia, 21/09/15.

Dual-purpose crops : Comparison of maternal systems grazing canola or wheat during late pregnancy and lambing then lucerne-based pasture until weaning. / McGrath, Shawn; Friend, Michael.

17th Proceedings of the Australian Agronomy Conference: Building productive, diverse and sustainable landscapes. Australia : Australian Society of Agronomy, 2015. p. 765-771.

Research output: Book chapter/Published conference paperConference paper

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AU - Friend, Michael

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N2 - Dual-purpose crops can reduce winter feed gaps and allow an increase in farm stocking rates on mixed farms.This study sought to compare the effect of inclusion of dual-purpose crops on livestock systemsproducing meat only compared with a system producing meat and wool. Six plots (1.86ha) were sown toeither dual-purpose wheat or canola in April 2014 in a replicated design. White Dorper ewes joined to eitherWhite Suffolk (WSD) or White Dorper (Dorper) rams, and Merino ewes joined to White Suffolk (WSM)rams were scanned in lamb on 15 May and allocated to plots on 19 June at a stocking rate of 13 ewes/ha,with a minimum of six ewes of each genotype per plot. Lambing commenced on 13 July and lamb birth weights were recorded. Ewes and lambs grazed lucerne-based pasture from 12 August until weaning on 29 September when all ewes and lambs were weighed. Crude protein levels were initially higher in wheat, but were lower at the conclusion of grazing; digestibility was initially similar between crops but declined in wheat during the grazing period; and NDF was always lower in canola compared to wheat (all P<0.001). Ewe liveweights were significantly (P<0.001) heavier when grazing wheat compared to canola at the end of crop grazing, but there was no significant difference at weaning. The interaction of crop and lamb genotype was significant for lamb weaning weights (P=0.027) with White Dorper lambs from the wheat treatments being significantly lighter than from the canola treatment.

AB - Dual-purpose crops can reduce winter feed gaps and allow an increase in farm stocking rates on mixed farms.This study sought to compare the effect of inclusion of dual-purpose crops on livestock systemsproducing meat only compared with a system producing meat and wool. Six plots (1.86ha) were sown toeither dual-purpose wheat or canola in April 2014 in a replicated design. White Dorper ewes joined to eitherWhite Suffolk (WSD) or White Dorper (Dorper) rams, and Merino ewes joined to White Suffolk (WSM)rams were scanned in lamb on 15 May and allocated to plots on 19 June at a stocking rate of 13 ewes/ha,with a minimum of six ewes of each genotype per plot. Lambing commenced on 13 July and lamb birth weights were recorded. Ewes and lambs grazed lucerne-based pasture from 12 August until weaning on 29 September when all ewes and lambs were weighed. Crude protein levels were initially higher in wheat, but were lower at the conclusion of grazing; digestibility was initially similar between crops but declined in wheat during the grazing period; and NDF was always lower in canola compared to wheat (all P<0.001). Ewe liveweights were significantly (P<0.001) heavier when grazing wheat compared to canola at the end of crop grazing, but there was no significant difference at weaning. The interaction of crop and lamb genotype was significant for lamb weaning weights (P=0.027) with White Dorper lambs from the wheat treatments being significantly lighter than from the canola treatment.

KW - Mixed farming

KW - crop grazing

KW - reproducing ewes

KW - White Dorper

KW - Merino

M3 - Conference paper

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EP - 771

BT - 17th Proceedings of the Australian Agronomy Conference

PB - Australian Society of Agronomy

CY - Australia

ER -

McGrath S, Friend M. Dual-purpose crops: Comparison of maternal systems grazing canola or wheat during late pregnancy and lambing then lucerne-based pasture until weaning. In 17th Proceedings of the Australian Agronomy Conference: Building productive, diverse and sustainable landscapes. Australia: Australian Society of Agronomy. 2015. p. 765-771