Early school-based parent involvement, children's self-regulated learning and academic achievement: An Australian longitudinal study

Graham Daniel, Cen Wang, Donna Berthelsen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

36 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Parent involvement is widely accepted as being associated with children’s improved educational outcomes. However, the role of early school-based parent involvement is still being established. This study investigated the mediating role of self-regulated learning behaviors in the relationship between early school-based parent involvement and children’s academic achievement, using data from the Longitudinal Study of Australian Children (N = 2616). Family socioeconomic position, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander status, language background, child gender and cognitive competence, were controlled, as well home and community based parent involvement activity in order to derive a more confident interpretation of the results. Structural equation modeling analyses showed that children’s self-regulated learning behaviors fully mediated the relationships between school-based parent involvement at Grade 1 and children’s reading achievement at Grade 3. Importantly, these relationships were evident for children across all socio-economic backgrounds. Although there was no direct relationship between parent involvement at Grade 1 and numeracy achievement at Grade 3, parent involvement was indirectly associated with higher children's numeracy achievement through children’s self-regulation of learning behaviors, though this relationship was stronger for children from middle and higher socio-economic backgrounds. Implications for policy and practice are discussed, and further research recommended.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)168-177
Number of pages10
JournalEarly Childhood Research Quarterly
Volume36
Issue number3rd Quarter
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016

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