Echinococcus granulosus and other intestinal helminths: Current status of prevalence and management in rural dogs of eastern Australia

David J Jenkins, Jan J Lievaart, B Boufana, W S Lett, H Bradshaw, M T Armua-Fernandez

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: Ascertain the prevalence of intestinal helminths in rural dogs from eastern Australia and Tasmania. Identify farm management practices contributing to the perpetuation and transmission of Echinococcus granulosus.
Methods: Helminth infection in dogs was determined microscopically through faecal flotation. Infection with E. granulosus was determined via faecal antigen-capture ELISA and coproPCR. Taeniid eggs were identified using molecular methods. Data on dog management and owner understanding of hydatid disease were collected via questionnaire.
Results: Faeces were collected from 1425 Australian rural dogs (1119 mainland; 306 Tasmania). Eggs of hookworms were most prevalent, up to 40.2%, followed by whipworms (Trichuris vulpis), up to 21.2%. Roundworms (Toxocara canis and Toxascaris leonine) were least common, up to 6.1%. Taeniid eggs were found in 11 dogs (5 Taenia pisiformis; 2 T. serialis; 4 T. hydatigena); 2 of the T. hydatigena-infected dogs were also E. granulosus coproantigen-positive. Of the 45 dogs found to be E. granulosus coproantigen-positive, 24 were in Tasmania, 16 in NSW, 3 in Victoria and 2 in Queensland. Three Tasmanian coproantigen ELISA-positive dogs were also coproPCR-positive. The most common dog ration was commercial dry food, but half the owners fed raw meat to their dogs and some fed offal of lambs (8.9%) or mutton (7.8%). More than half (69%) of owners weighed their dogs before deworming. Few dewormed their dogs often enough to ensure they remained cestode-free and owners hunting wildlife usually left carcases where they were shot.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)292-298
Number of pages7
JournalAustralian Veterinary Journal
Volume92
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Echinococcus granulosus and other intestinal helminths: Current status of prevalence and management in rural dogs of eastern Australia'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this