Effect of added caffeic acid and tyrosol on the fatty acid and volatile profiles of camellia oil following heating

Zhong Haiyan, Danny Bedgood, Andrea Bishop, Paul Prenzler, Kevin Robards

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

34 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Camellia oil is widely used in some parts of the world partly because of its high oxidative stability. The effect of heating a refined camellia oil for 1 h at 120 °C or 2 h at 170 °C with exogenous antioxidant, namely, caffeic acid and tyrosol, was studied. Parameters used to assess the effect of heating were peroxide and K values, volatile formation, and fatty acid profile. Of these, volatile formation was the most sensitive index of change as seen in the number of volatiles and the total area count of volatiles in gas chromatograms. Hexanal was generally the dominant volatile in treated and untreated samples with a concentration of 2.13 and 5.34 mg kg-1 in untreated oils heated at 120 and 170 °C, respectively. The hexanal content was significantly reduced in heated oils to which tyrosol and/or caffeic acid had been added. Using volatile formation as an index of oxidation, tyrosol was the more effective antioxidant of these compounds. This is contradictory to generally accepted antioxidant structure'activity relationships. Changes in fatty acid profiles after heating for up to 24 h at 180 °C were not significant.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)9551-9558
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry
Volume54
Issue number25
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2006

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Effect of added caffeic acid and tyrosol on the fatty acid and volatile profiles of camellia oil following heating'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this