Effect of coppicing, thinning and throughfall reduction on soil water content and soil CO2 efflux in a sessile oak forest

Eva Darenova, Richard Azu Crabbe, Robert Knott, Barbora Uherkova, Jan Kadavy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)
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Abstract

In this study we determined the effect of transformation of a mature sessile oak forest stand into a coppiced forest, and of thinning and through fall reduction in a coppice stand on soil water content (SWC) and soil CO2 efflux. The precipitation reduction was induced by installing parallel drainage channels in both unthinned and thinned coppice stands. The driving factor for temporal dynamics of soil CO2 efflux in all plots was soil temperature. The other factor was soil water content but only up to about 15%. Above this threshold, there was no more effect on CO2 efflux. We found no clear difference in SWC or soil CO2 efflux between the mature and coppiced stand eight years after harvesting. On the other hand, thinning of the coppice stand resulted in increase in SWC up to 22% in proportion, which we assume to be a result of increased gap fraction of the canopy. However, no effect on soil CO2 efflux was observed two years after the thinning. Installation of the drainage channels in two plots covering 30% of the ground area resulted in decrease in SWC up to a proportional 30.5% and thus contributed up to 50.7% reduction in soil CO2 efflux.
Original languageEnglish
Article number9927
Pages (from-to)1-20
Number of pages20
JournalSilva Fennica
Volume52
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 07 May 2018

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