Effects of meloxicam and phenylbutazone on renal responses to furosemide, dobutamine, and exercise in horses

Sharanne Raidal, Kristopher Hughes, Amanda-Lee Charman, Sharon Nielsen, Jacqueline Philips, Glenys Noble

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective—To compare the effects of 2 NSAIDs (phenylbutazone and meloxicam) on renal function in horses.
Animals—9 Thoroughbred or Standardbred mares (mean ± SD age, 5.22 ± 1.09 years [range, 2 to 12 years]; mean body weight, 470 ± 25 kg [range, 442 to 510 kg]).
Procedures—A randomized blinded placebo-controlled crossover study was conducted to examine the effects of treatment with phenylbutazone, meloxicam, or a placebo (control solution) on renal responses to the administration of furosemide, dobutamine, and exercise (15 minutes at 60% of maximum heart rate). Renal function was assessed by use of bilat-eral ureteral catheterization for simultaneous determination of creatinine clearance, sodium excretion, and urine flow rate.
Results—Both phenylbutazone and meloxicam attenuated diuresis and natriuresis and reduced glomerular filtration rate, compared with results for the control solution, when horses were treated with furosemide. Mean arterial blood pressure, urine flow rate, and glomerular filtration rate were increased during or after (or both) dobutamine infusion. Both NSAIDs reduced urine flow rate and sodium excretion associated with dobutamine infusion and exercise but had no effect on glomerular filtration rate.
Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Responses to meloxicam, a cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 preferential agent, appeared comparable to those detected after phenylbutazone treat-ment, which suggested that COX-2 was the mediator of prostanoid-induced changes to re-nal function in horses and indicated that COX-2–preferential agents would be likely to have adverse renal effects similar to those for nonselective COX inhibitors in volume-depleted horses. (Am J Vet Res 2014;75:668–679)
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)668-679
Number of pages12
JournalAmerican Journal of Veterinary Research
Volume75
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

Fingerprint

meloxicam
phenylbutazone
Phenylbutazone
furosemide
Dobutamine
Furosemide
prostaglandin synthase
Horses
exercise
kidneys
Kidney
horses
urine
nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents
Urine
Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Agents
renal function
Cyclooxygenase 2
placebos
Arterial Pressure

Cite this

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title = "Effects of meloxicam and phenylbutazone on renal responses to furosemide, dobutamine, and exercise in horses",
abstract = "Objective—To compare the effects of 2 NSAIDs (phenylbutazone and meloxicam) on renal function in horses.Animals—9 Thoroughbred or Standardbred mares (mean ± SD age, 5.22 ± 1.09 years [range, 2 to 12 years]; mean body weight, 470 ± 25 kg [range, 442 to 510 kg]).Procedures—A randomized blinded placebo-controlled crossover study was conducted to examine the effects of treatment with phenylbutazone, meloxicam, or a placebo (control solution) on renal responses to the administration of furosemide, dobutamine, and exercise (15 minutes at 60{\%} of maximum heart rate). Renal function was assessed by use of bilat-eral ureteral catheterization for simultaneous determination of creatinine clearance, sodium excretion, and urine flow rate.Results—Both phenylbutazone and meloxicam attenuated diuresis and natriuresis and reduced glomerular filtration rate, compared with results for the control solution, when horses were treated with furosemide. Mean arterial blood pressure, urine flow rate, and glomerular filtration rate were increased during or after (or both) dobutamine infusion. Both NSAIDs reduced urine flow rate and sodium excretion associated with dobutamine infusion and exercise but had no effect on glomerular filtration rate.Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Responses to meloxicam, a cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 preferential agent, appeared comparable to those detected after phenylbutazone treat-ment, which suggested that COX-2 was the mediator of prostanoid-induced changes to re-nal function in horses and indicated that COX-2–preferential agents would be likely to have adverse renal effects similar to those for nonselective COX inhibitors in volume-depleted horses. (Am J Vet Res 2014;75:668–679)",
author = "Sharanne Raidal and Kristopher Hughes and Amanda-Lee Charman and Sharon Nielsen and Jacqueline Philips and Glenys Noble",
note = "Imported on 12 Apr 2017 - DigiTool details were: Journal title (773t) = American Journal of Veterinary Research. ISSNs: 0002-9645;",
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doi = "10.2460/ajvr.75.7.668",
language = "English",
volume = "75",
pages = "668--679",
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TY - JOUR

T1 - Effects of meloxicam and phenylbutazone on renal responses to furosemide, dobutamine, and exercise in horses

AU - Raidal, Sharanne

AU - Hughes, Kristopher

AU - Charman, Amanda-Lee

AU - Nielsen, Sharon

AU - Philips, Jacqueline

AU - Noble, Glenys

N1 - Imported on 12 Apr 2017 - DigiTool details were: Journal title (773t) = American Journal of Veterinary Research. ISSNs: 0002-9645;

PY - 2014

Y1 - 2014

N2 - Objective—To compare the effects of 2 NSAIDs (phenylbutazone and meloxicam) on renal function in horses.Animals—9 Thoroughbred or Standardbred mares (mean ± SD age, 5.22 ± 1.09 years [range, 2 to 12 years]; mean body weight, 470 ± 25 kg [range, 442 to 510 kg]).Procedures—A randomized blinded placebo-controlled crossover study was conducted to examine the effects of treatment with phenylbutazone, meloxicam, or a placebo (control solution) on renal responses to the administration of furosemide, dobutamine, and exercise (15 minutes at 60% of maximum heart rate). Renal function was assessed by use of bilat-eral ureteral catheterization for simultaneous determination of creatinine clearance, sodium excretion, and urine flow rate.Results—Both phenylbutazone and meloxicam attenuated diuresis and natriuresis and reduced glomerular filtration rate, compared with results for the control solution, when horses were treated with furosemide. Mean arterial blood pressure, urine flow rate, and glomerular filtration rate were increased during or after (or both) dobutamine infusion. Both NSAIDs reduced urine flow rate and sodium excretion associated with dobutamine infusion and exercise but had no effect on glomerular filtration rate.Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Responses to meloxicam, a cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 preferential agent, appeared comparable to those detected after phenylbutazone treat-ment, which suggested that COX-2 was the mediator of prostanoid-induced changes to re-nal function in horses and indicated that COX-2–preferential agents would be likely to have adverse renal effects similar to those for nonselective COX inhibitors in volume-depleted horses. (Am J Vet Res 2014;75:668–679)

AB - Objective—To compare the effects of 2 NSAIDs (phenylbutazone and meloxicam) on renal function in horses.Animals—9 Thoroughbred or Standardbred mares (mean ± SD age, 5.22 ± 1.09 years [range, 2 to 12 years]; mean body weight, 470 ± 25 kg [range, 442 to 510 kg]).Procedures—A randomized blinded placebo-controlled crossover study was conducted to examine the effects of treatment with phenylbutazone, meloxicam, or a placebo (control solution) on renal responses to the administration of furosemide, dobutamine, and exercise (15 minutes at 60% of maximum heart rate). Renal function was assessed by use of bilat-eral ureteral catheterization for simultaneous determination of creatinine clearance, sodium excretion, and urine flow rate.Results—Both phenylbutazone and meloxicam attenuated diuresis and natriuresis and reduced glomerular filtration rate, compared with results for the control solution, when horses were treated with furosemide. Mean arterial blood pressure, urine flow rate, and glomerular filtration rate were increased during or after (or both) dobutamine infusion. Both NSAIDs reduced urine flow rate and sodium excretion associated with dobutamine infusion and exercise but had no effect on glomerular filtration rate.Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Responses to meloxicam, a cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 preferential agent, appeared comparable to those detected after phenylbutazone treat-ment, which suggested that COX-2 was the mediator of prostanoid-induced changes to re-nal function in horses and indicated that COX-2–preferential agents would be likely to have adverse renal effects similar to those for nonselective COX inhibitors in volume-depleted horses. (Am J Vet Res 2014;75:668–679)

U2 - 10.2460/ajvr.75.7.668

DO - 10.2460/ajvr.75.7.668

M3 - Article

VL - 75

SP - 668

EP - 679

JO - American Journal of Veterinary Research

JF - American Journal of Veterinary Research

SN - 0002-9645

IS - 7

ER -