Effects of mindfulness-based stress reduction on stress, depression, self-esteem, and mindfulness in Thai nursing students

Research output: Other contribution to conferenceAbstract

Abstract

It is well recognized that nursing and other health professional students may experience high levels of stress in the course of their university studies. This presentation reports findings from a study investigating whether a mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) program can decrease stress and depression as well as enhance self-esteem and mindfulness in Thai nursing students. A randomized controlled trial was conducted using nursing students (n = 127) from a university in northern Thailand. Participants were randomized to either an intervention group (n = 63) receiving an 8-week, researcher-conducted MBSR program, or a control group (n = 64) receiving usual care. Measures included the Thai version of the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS-10), the Centre for Epidemiology Studies – Depression Scale (CES-D), the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES), and the Mindful Attention Awareness Scale (MAAS), with data being collected at baseline, 8 weeks, 16 weeks and 32 weeks. One control participant dropped out, and all MBSR participants completed the intervention and all stages of data collection. Results using linear mixed modelling demonstrated a significant difference between participants in the intervention and control groups for the change over time in stress (P = 0.0190), self-esteem (P = <0.0001), and mindfulness (P = 0.0002). However, there was no statistically significant difference for depression between groups (P = 0.1904). Compared to controls, MBSR participants experienced a significantly greater reduction in stress at weeks 8 and 16 as compared to baseline; however, the effect was non-significant at week 32; MBSR participants also experienced greater improvements in self-esteem and mindfulness at all time points. These findings support the utility of MBSR in helping nursing students to more effectively cope with stress. Sustained benefits over time of MBSR may also contribute to improving academic performance, quality of nursing care, and the wellbeing of future nurses.
Original languageEnglish
Pages1-1
Number of pages1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2015
EventAustralian College of Mental Health Nursing 41st International Mental Health Nursing Conference - Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre, Brisbane, Australia
Duration: 07 Oct 201509 Oct 2015
Conference number: 41st
https://nswmentalhealthcommission.com.au/events/41st-international-mental-health-nursing-conference
https://web.archive.org/web/20150316042055/http://www.acmhn2015.com/#!abstracts/c13gz (Call for abstracts and publication in journal)
https://www.acmhnpastevents.com/2015 (Conference website)

Conference

ConferenceAustralian College of Mental Health Nursing 41st International Mental Health Nursing Conference
Abbreviated titleMental Health Nurses: Shifting culture, leading change
CountryAustralia
CityBrisbane
Period07/10/1509/10/15
OtherThe 41st International Mental Health Nursing Conference was held in Brisbane at the Brisbane Convention Centre, from the 7th – 9th October 2014, with a workshop and the Oration and Investiture on the 6th. The conference challenged speakers and delegates to get involved in the future of the profession; to consider and discuss how the profession can be moved forward,; and how mental health nurses can move from the ‘bedside to the boardroom’. Mental health nursing leadership is the key. Step up, this is the future of mental health nursing.
Internet address

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Mindfulness
Nursing Students
Self Concept
Depression
Control Groups
Quality of Health Care
Thailand
Nursing Care
Epidemiology
Nursing
Randomized Controlled Trials
Nurses
Research Personnel
Students

Cite this

Aeamla-Or, N., Hazelton, M., & Rossiter, R. (2015). Effects of mindfulness-based stress reduction on stress, depression, self-esteem, and mindfulness in Thai nursing students. 1-1. Abstract from Australian College of Mental Health Nursing 41st International Mental Health Nursing Conference, Brisbane, Australia. https://doi.org/10.1111/inm.12172/epdf
Aeamla-Or, Napaporn ; Hazelton, Michael ; Rossiter, Rachel. / Effects of mindfulness-based stress reduction on stress, depression, self-esteem, and mindfulness in Thai nursing students. Abstract from Australian College of Mental Health Nursing 41st International Mental Health Nursing Conference, Brisbane, Australia.1 p.
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Aeamla-Or, N, Hazelton, M & Rossiter, R 2015, 'Effects of mindfulness-based stress reduction on stress, depression, self-esteem, and mindfulness in Thai nursing students', Australian College of Mental Health Nursing 41st International Mental Health Nursing Conference, Brisbane, Australia, 07/10/15 - 09/10/15 pp. 1-1. https://doi.org/10.1111/inm.12172/epdf

Effects of mindfulness-based stress reduction on stress, depression, self-esteem, and mindfulness in Thai nursing students. / Aeamla-Or, Napaporn; Hazelton, Michael; Rossiter, Rachel.

2015. 1-1 Abstract from Australian College of Mental Health Nursing 41st International Mental Health Nursing Conference, Brisbane, Australia.

Research output: Other contribution to conferenceAbstract

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Aeamla-Or N, Hazelton M, Rossiter R. Effects of mindfulness-based stress reduction on stress, depression, self-esteem, and mindfulness in Thai nursing students. 2015. Abstract from Australian College of Mental Health Nursing 41st International Mental Health Nursing Conference, Brisbane, Australia. https://doi.org/10.1111/inm.12172/epdf