Elevated root-zone temperature hastens vegetative and reproductive development in Shiraz grapevines

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background and Aims: Springtime root-zone warming activates mobilisation of the root carbohydrate reserves, a critical source of carbon for early canopy and reproductive development in grapevines following winter dormancy. Seasonal variability in soil temperature during spring may result in inconsistent vegetative growth and fruitset with consequences for berry growth and ripening. Methods and Results: We monitored flowering and berry ripening in Shiraz grapevines (Vitis viniferaL.) grown in large temperature-controlled pots. The vines were exposed to a cool, ambient and warm root-zone temperature from budburst to fruitset. Root starch mobilisation after budburst was linearly correlated to the cumulative heat units received by the soil. A warm root-zone temperature also hastened leaf expansion, net positive carbon assimilation, onset of flowering and fruit set, berry enlargement and the onset of veraison. At harvest, berry pH and nitrogen concentration as well as fresh and dry mass were higher for the vines exposed to a warm root-zone while berry acidity was lower. Conclusions: Warm soil temperature in spring stimulated the mobilisation of carbohydrates in the roots and accelerated shoot and reproductive development, resulting in larger berries with lower acidity. Significance of the Study: Because root-zone temperature is an environmental driver of berry size and composition, models predicting yield and berry composition can be fine-tuned to incorporate this critical parameter.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)123-133
Number of pages11
JournalAustralian Journal of Grape and Wine Research
Volume20
Issue number1
Early online date2013
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2014

Fingerprint

root zone temperature
small fruits
vines
soil temperature
acidity
rhizosphere
ripening
carbohydrates
flowering
Vitis
leaf development
fruit set
dormancy
vegetative growth
seasonal variation
starch
canopy
heat
shoots
winter

Cite this

@article{379b943bdc414d83bf07b9e43bde7d26,
title = "Elevated root-zone temperature hastens vegetative and reproductive development in Shiraz grapevines",
abstract = "Background and Aims: Springtime root-zone warming activates mobilisation of the root carbohydrate reserves, a critical source of carbon for early canopy and reproductive development in grapevines following winter dormancy. Seasonal variability in soil temperature during spring may result in inconsistent vegetative growth and fruitset with consequences for berry growth and ripening. Methods and Results: We monitored flowering and berry ripening in Shiraz grapevines (Vitis viniferaL.) grown in large temperature-controlled pots. The vines were exposed to a cool, ambient and warm root-zone temperature from budburst to fruitset. Root starch mobilisation after budburst was linearly correlated to the cumulative heat units received by the soil. A warm root-zone temperature also hastened leaf expansion, net positive carbon assimilation, onset of flowering and fruit set, berry enlargement and the onset of veraison. At harvest, berry pH and nitrogen concentration as well as fresh and dry mass were higher for the vines exposed to a warm root-zone while berry acidity was lower. Conclusions: Warm soil temperature in spring stimulated the mobilisation of carbohydrates in the roots and accelerated shoot and reproductive development, resulting in larger berries with lower acidity. Significance of the Study: Because root-zone temperature is an environmental driver of berry size and composition, models predicting yield and berry composition can be fine-tuned to incorporate this critical parameter.",
keywords = "Berry composition, Canopy development, Carbohydrate mobilisation, Fruit ripening, Soil temperature",
author = "Suzy Rogiers and Simon Clarke and Leigh Schmidtke",
note = "Includes bibliographical references.",
year = "2014",
month = "2",
doi = "10.1111/ajgw.12053",
language = "English",
volume = "20",
pages = "123--133",
journal = "Australian Journal of Grape and Wine Research",
issn = "1322-7130",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Elevated root-zone temperature hastens vegetative and reproductive development in Shiraz grapevines

AU - Rogiers, Suzy

AU - Clarke, Simon

AU - Schmidtke, Leigh

N1 - Includes bibliographical references.

PY - 2014/2

Y1 - 2014/2

N2 - Background and Aims: Springtime root-zone warming activates mobilisation of the root carbohydrate reserves, a critical source of carbon for early canopy and reproductive development in grapevines following winter dormancy. Seasonal variability in soil temperature during spring may result in inconsistent vegetative growth and fruitset with consequences for berry growth and ripening. Methods and Results: We monitored flowering and berry ripening in Shiraz grapevines (Vitis viniferaL.) grown in large temperature-controlled pots. The vines were exposed to a cool, ambient and warm root-zone temperature from budburst to fruitset. Root starch mobilisation after budburst was linearly correlated to the cumulative heat units received by the soil. A warm root-zone temperature also hastened leaf expansion, net positive carbon assimilation, onset of flowering and fruit set, berry enlargement and the onset of veraison. At harvest, berry pH and nitrogen concentration as well as fresh and dry mass were higher for the vines exposed to a warm root-zone while berry acidity was lower. Conclusions: Warm soil temperature in spring stimulated the mobilisation of carbohydrates in the roots and accelerated shoot and reproductive development, resulting in larger berries with lower acidity. Significance of the Study: Because root-zone temperature is an environmental driver of berry size and composition, models predicting yield and berry composition can be fine-tuned to incorporate this critical parameter.

AB - Background and Aims: Springtime root-zone warming activates mobilisation of the root carbohydrate reserves, a critical source of carbon for early canopy and reproductive development in grapevines following winter dormancy. Seasonal variability in soil temperature during spring may result in inconsistent vegetative growth and fruitset with consequences for berry growth and ripening. Methods and Results: We monitored flowering and berry ripening in Shiraz grapevines (Vitis viniferaL.) grown in large temperature-controlled pots. The vines were exposed to a cool, ambient and warm root-zone temperature from budburst to fruitset. Root starch mobilisation after budburst was linearly correlated to the cumulative heat units received by the soil. A warm root-zone temperature also hastened leaf expansion, net positive carbon assimilation, onset of flowering and fruit set, berry enlargement and the onset of veraison. At harvest, berry pH and nitrogen concentration as well as fresh and dry mass were higher for the vines exposed to a warm root-zone while berry acidity was lower. Conclusions: Warm soil temperature in spring stimulated the mobilisation of carbohydrates in the roots and accelerated shoot and reproductive development, resulting in larger berries with lower acidity. Significance of the Study: Because root-zone temperature is an environmental driver of berry size and composition, models predicting yield and berry composition can be fine-tuned to incorporate this critical parameter.

KW - Berry composition

KW - Canopy development

KW - Carbohydrate mobilisation

KW - Fruit ripening

KW - Soil temperature

U2 - 10.1111/ajgw.12053

DO - 10.1111/ajgw.12053

M3 - Article

VL - 20

SP - 123

EP - 133

JO - Australian Journal of Grape and Wine Research

JF - Australian Journal of Grape and Wine Research

SN - 1322-7130

IS - 1

ER -