Enablers and barriers to interprofessional work-integrated learning placements: A qualitative study of rural and regional allied health supervisors’ perceptions

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Abstract

Work-integrated learning (WIL) is central to the delivery of high quality student learning that provides students with the knowledge, skills, attitudes and professional networks for successful careers. In rural and regional Australia WIL placements can be particularly challenging to source due to limited clinical supervision capacity. This article reports regional Allied Health clinical supervisors’ perceptions of enablers and barriers to engaging with interprofessional student WIL. A phenomenology of practice framework was used to interpret the data, highlighting three key themes: introducing an interprofessional lens early; tapping into unique possibilities; and setting up for success, balancing challenges with opportunities. The study identified key elements that may contribute to successful Allied Health interprofessional WIL placements in rural and regional settings, including incorporating early student placement opportunities, using shared interprofessional supervision to foster the development of junior clinicians’ supervisory skills, and ensuring clarity around the purpose and processes of each interprofessional placement.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)83-96
Number of pages14
JournalInternational Journal of Work-Integrated Learning
Volume22
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2021

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