Enhancing police responses to domestic violence incidents: Reports from client advocates in New South Wales

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Abstract

In an online survey about experiences with the police complaint system, 239 client advocates described a recent incident in which a client with grounds to lodge a complaint declined to do so. Almost one third of those incidents involved domestic violence. Thematic analysis of case descriptions revealed that many police did not take domestic violence reports seriously. A typology of problematic police conduct was developed. Many officers failed to observe current procedures and appeared to lack knowledge of relevant laws. Citizens feared retaliatory victimization by police and/or perceived that complaining was futile. Implications of these findings are reviewed in light of procedural justice theory.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1007-1026
Number of pages20
JournalViolence Against Women
Volume22
Issue number8
Early online date2015
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2016

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