Equine psittacosis and the emergence of Chlamydia psittaci as an equine abortigenic pathogen in southeastern Australia: A retrospective data analysis

Charles El-Hage, Alistair Legione, Joanne Devlin, Kristopher Hughes, Cheryl Jenkins, James Gilkerson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Citations (Scopus)
56 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Chlamydia psittaci is an important zoonotic pathogen. Although primarily a pathogen of birds, from which infection can spillover into humans and other mammalian hosts, the importance of C. psittaci as a cause of equine reproductive loss and the risk of infection to humans in contact with infected horses are increasingly being recognised in Australia and elsewhere. Despite the risks to both human and equine health, C. psittaci infection in horses is incompletely understood. This study aimed to update and summarise cases of equine psittacosis in Australia in the period 2018–2022, thus addressing a knowledge gap relating to recent cases in this country. These cases were identified from the examination of records held by state and federal veterinary authorities and from a review of published cases. A total of 31 cases were identified. Spatial and temporal trends were identified, with cases being more prevalent in winter and spring and geographically restricted to Victoria and New South Wales. The results show that cases of equine reproductive loss due to C. psittaci are consistent and ongoing and demonstrate the importance of routinely considering C. psittaci in diagnostic investigations. The need for ongoing study to better understand this important zoonotic pathogen is evident.

Original languageEnglish
Article number2443
Pages (from-to)1-6
Number of pages6
JournalAnimals
Volume13
Issue number15
Early online date28 Jul 2023
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2023

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Equine psittacosis and the emergence of Chlamydia psittaci as an equine abortigenic pathogen in southeastern Australia: A retrospective data analysis'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this