Establishing normative data for peripheral arterial disease using pulse wave analysis

Lisa Thompson, Herbert Jelinek, David Cornforth

Research output: Book chapter/Published conference paperConference paper

1 Citation (Scopus)
16 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) affects 10'25% of people over the age of 55. It contributes to foot amputation, morbidity and mortality. Accurate and early diagnosis can lessen this public health burden. A current clinical measure of PAD such as the ankle brachial pressure index (ABPI) has low sensitivity and specificity for asymptomatic disease and calcified arteries especially in the diabetic population. Therefore, a new non-invasive evaluation method for lower limb vasualisation has been investigated. Pulse wave analysis (PWA) including peak blood flow velocity (PBFV) and fractal dimension (FD) of the velocity waveform. A 'non pathological' group students and staff was selected using convenience sampling at Charles Sturt University. We observed two and three peak velocity waveforms (51.7%) which indicate normal flow but also a high occurrence (33.33%) of pre-peaks and four peaks in the pulse wave not reported previously. Normative values were determined for PBFV (95% CI 9.9-37.3 cm/sec) and the fractal dimension (95% Cl 1.082-1.261). The results indicate that this study warrants further investigation into the potential for PBFV or FD to be used as a clinical assessment tool to identify early asymptomatic PAD.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationISSNIP 2008
Place of PublicationUSA/Canada
PublisherIEEE
Pages351-356
Number of pages6
ISBN (Electronic)9781424438228
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2008
EventInternational Conference on Intelligent Sensors, Sensor Networks and Information Processing - Sydney, NSW Australia, Australia
Duration: 15 Dec 200818 Dec 2008

Conference

ConferenceInternational Conference on Intelligent Sensors, Sensor Networks and Information Processing
CountryAustralia
Period15/12/0818/12/08

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