Ethical considerations when using visual methods in digital storytelling with Aboriginal young people in Southeast Australia

Fran Edmonds, Michelle Evans, Scott McQuire, Richard Chenhall

Research output: Book chapter/Published conference paperChapter (peer-reviewed)

10 Citations (Scopus)
3 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

This chapter discusses a digital storytelling project involving young Aboriginal people from southeast Australia who used the creative capacities of digital technologies to explore subjective experiences of identity. We discuss three key ethical considerations that supported and emerged from working with young Aboriginal people. Decolonization, the participation gap and situated learning were critical factors that were important in developing an ethical framework for engagement in research with Aboriginal young people. The approach sought to address the challenges that Aboriginal youth continue to experience, including marginalization from mainstream society, negative stereotyping and lingering misperceptions of real Aboriginal identities in contemporary urban Australia. The visual content arising from the workshops supported Aboriginal young people to reposition their contemporary visual self-representations as diverse and authentic.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationEthics and visual research methods
Subtitle of host publicationTheory, methodology and practice
EditorsDeborah Warr, Susan Cox, Marilys Guillemin, Jenny Waycott
Place of PublicationUnited States
PublisherPalgrave Macmillan
Chapter13
Pages171-184
Number of pages14
Edition1st
ISBN (Electronic)9781137543059
ISBN (Print)9781137548542
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01 Jan 2016

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