Exploring adventure therapy as an early intervention for struggling adolescents

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This paper presents an account of a research project that explored the experiences of adolescents struggling with behaviouraland emotional issues, who participated in a 14-day adventure therapy program in Australia referred to by the pseudonym,'Onward Adventures.' All participants of this program over the age of 16 who completed within the last two years wereasked to complete a survey. Additionally, the parents of these participants were invited to complete a similar survey. Thequalitative surveys were designed to question participants' and parents' perceptions of the program (pre- and post-), therelationships (therapeutic alliance) built with program therapists, follow-up support, and outcomes of the program. Bothparticipants and parents reported strong relationships with program leaders, stressed the importance of effective follow-upservices, and perceived positive outcomes when it came to self-esteem and social skills, seeing comparable improvement inself-concept, overall behaviour, and coping skills.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)33-41
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Outdoor and Environmental Education
Volume19
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - 2016

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title = "Exploring adventure therapy as an early intervention for struggling adolescents",
abstract = "This paper presents an account of a research project that explored the experiences of adolescents struggling with behaviouraland emotional issues, who participated in a 14-day adventure therapy program in Australia referred to by the pseudonym,'Onward Adventures.' All participants of this program over the age of 16 who completed within the last two years wereasked to complete a survey. Additionally, the parents of these participants were invited to complete a similar survey. Thequalitative surveys were designed to question participants' and parents' perceptions of the program (pre- and post-), therelationships (therapeutic alliance) built with program therapists, follow-up support, and outcomes of the program. Bothparticipants and parents reported strong relationships with program leaders, stressed the importance of effective follow-upservices, and perceived positive outcomes when it came to self-esteem and social skills, seeing comparable improvement inself-concept, overall behaviour, and coping skills.",
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Exploring adventure therapy as an early intervention for struggling adolescents. / Dobud, Wilson.

In: Journal of Outdoor and Environmental Education, Vol. 19, No. 1, 2016, p. 33-41.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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