Exploring patterns of offending by juvenile offenders in Australia: What is the evidence for a specialist violent offender?

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Abstract

The question of whether there are offenders who specialise in violent offences is one that has been of considerable interest to life course developmental criminology as well as policy makers and the public. The current study investigated this using an administrative dataset of juvenile offenders from New South Wales, Australia. Specifically, it asked whether offenders convicted of a serious violent offence differed in their demographic, criminal history and reoffending profiles and whether there were further differences in these factors across gender and cultural identity. Overall, the findings indicated that violence is more likely to occur in the context of an extensive criminal career. Indigenous male individuals were the most frequent and chronic offenders in the sample. The policy and theoretical implications of these findings are discussed.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)304-324
Number of pages21
JournalJournal of Developmental and Life Course Criminology
Volume1
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2015

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