Exports,energy and the environment in China

An input-output perspective

Yutian Shi, Kishor Sharma, Tom Murphy, John Hicks, Lesley Arthur

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

This paper investigates how the changing structure of Chinese foreign trade has impacted on employment and energy-intensity in recent years. Our findings indicate a considerable fall in both employment and energy intensity. A fall in employment intensity appears to be mainly due to an increase in the exports of assembly items which are relatively less unskilled employment intensive, while a decline in energy consumption, per billion yuan worth of exports, appears to be due to increased use of energy saving technology as the price of energy rises and the pressure for improving Chinese environmental standards grows. While a fall in energy consumption is a welcome development, overall environmental standards in China remain a major concern, not only for the Chinese but globally. The paper also suggests that increased investment in human capital is part of the answer to increasing employment in the modern economy while minimising damage to the environment.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)279-293
Number of pages15
JournalInterdisciplinary Environmental Review
Volume13
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012

Fingerprint

Energy
China
Energy consumption
Energy intensity
Environmental standards
Energy saving
Human capital
Foreign trade
Damage

Cite this

@article{24c7e8798a6443c1a533bdedbb85f125,
title = "Exports,energy and the environment in China: An input-output perspective",
abstract = "This paper investigates how the changing structure of Chinese foreign trade has impacted on employment and energy-intensity in recent years. Our findings indicate a considerable fall in both employment and energy intensity. A fall in employment intensity appears to be mainly due to an increase in the exports of assembly items which are relatively less unskilled employment intensive, while a decline in energy consumption, per billion yuan worth of exports, appears to be due to increased use of energy saving technology as the price of energy rises and the pressure for improving Chinese environmental standards grows. While a fall in energy consumption is a welcome development, overall environmental standards in China remain a major concern, not only for the Chinese but globally. The paper also suggests that increased investment in human capital is part of the answer to increasing employment in the modern economy while minimising damage to the environment.",
author = "Yutian Shi and Kishor Sharma and Tom Murphy and John Hicks and Lesley Arthur",
note = "Imported on 12 Apr 2017 - DigiTool details were: Journal title (773t) = Interdisciplinary Environmental Review. ISSNs: 1521-0227;",
year = "2012",
doi = "10.1504/IER.2012.051438",
language = "English",
volume = "13",
pages = "279--293",
journal = "Interdisciplinary Environmental Review",
issn = "1521-0227",
publisher = "Inderscience",
number = "4",

}

Exports,energy and the environment in China : An input-output perspective. / Shi, Yutian; Sharma, Kishor; Murphy, Tom; Hicks, John; Arthur, Lesley.

In: Interdisciplinary Environmental Review, Vol. 13, No. 4, 2012, p. 279-293.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Exports,energy and the environment in China

T2 - An input-output perspective

AU - Shi, Yutian

AU - Sharma, Kishor

AU - Murphy, Tom

AU - Hicks, John

AU - Arthur, Lesley

N1 - Imported on 12 Apr 2017 - DigiTool details were: Journal title (773t) = Interdisciplinary Environmental Review. ISSNs: 1521-0227;

PY - 2012

Y1 - 2012

N2 - This paper investigates how the changing structure of Chinese foreign trade has impacted on employment and energy-intensity in recent years. Our findings indicate a considerable fall in both employment and energy intensity. A fall in employment intensity appears to be mainly due to an increase in the exports of assembly items which are relatively less unskilled employment intensive, while a decline in energy consumption, per billion yuan worth of exports, appears to be due to increased use of energy saving technology as the price of energy rises and the pressure for improving Chinese environmental standards grows. While a fall in energy consumption is a welcome development, overall environmental standards in China remain a major concern, not only for the Chinese but globally. The paper also suggests that increased investment in human capital is part of the answer to increasing employment in the modern economy while minimising damage to the environment.

AB - This paper investigates how the changing structure of Chinese foreign trade has impacted on employment and energy-intensity in recent years. Our findings indicate a considerable fall in both employment and energy intensity. A fall in employment intensity appears to be mainly due to an increase in the exports of assembly items which are relatively less unskilled employment intensive, while a decline in energy consumption, per billion yuan worth of exports, appears to be due to increased use of energy saving technology as the price of energy rises and the pressure for improving Chinese environmental standards grows. While a fall in energy consumption is a welcome development, overall environmental standards in China remain a major concern, not only for the Chinese but globally. The paper also suggests that increased investment in human capital is part of the answer to increasing employment in the modern economy while minimising damage to the environment.

U2 - 10.1504/IER.2012.051438

DO - 10.1504/IER.2012.051438

M3 - Article

VL - 13

SP - 279

EP - 293

JO - Interdisciplinary Environmental Review

JF - Interdisciplinary Environmental Review

SN - 1521-0227

IS - 4

ER -