Factors affecting pasture growth in a topographically diverse native perennial grass pasture on the Central Tablelands of New South Wales

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Abstract

Thirty-six sampling locations in a variable landscape paddock on the Central Tablelands of NSW were established to determine the effect of soil chemical, soil physical and botanical composition factors on pasture production. Combinations of these factors were found to be good predictors of potential pasture production. Subterranean clover frequency and the ability of soil to hold moisture were predictors of pasture production in both years. Subterranean clover frequency was in turn affected by soil physical characteristics and at a second tier level by soil available phosphorus (P) in year 1 and soil aluminium in year 2. The results of this research indicate that researchers, advisors and producers need to consider more than just soil available P levels in assessing productive potential of pasture paddocks and their likely response to fertiliser application. Subdivision of variable landscape paddocks on an aspect/position on slope basis appears warranted based on the findings of this study. Subdivision would allow for enhanced management of grazing and better targeting of fertiliser to nutrient responsive areas of the landscape.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication15th AAC
Subtitle of host publicationFood security from sustainable agriculture
EditorsH. Dove, R. Culvenor
Place of PublicationAustralia
PublisherThe Regional Institute
Pages1-6
Number of pages6
Publication statusPublished - 2010
Event15th Australian Agronomy Conference - Lincoln, New Zealand, New Zealand
Duration: 15 Nov 201018 Nov 2010

Conference

Conference15th Australian Agronomy Conference
CountryNew Zealand
Period15/11/1018/11/10

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  • Cite this

    Hackney, B., Orchard, P., Kemp, D., Virgona, J., & Orchard, B. (2010). Factors affecting pasture growth in a topographically diverse native perennial grass pasture on the Central Tablelands of New South Wales. In H. Dove, & R. Culvenor (Eds.), 15th AAC: Food security from sustainable agriculture (pp. 1-6). The Regional Institute.