Factors contributing to nurse job satisfaction in the acute hospital setting: review of recent literature

Bronwyn Hayes, Ann Bonner, Julie Pryor

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

131 Citations (Scopus)
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Abstract

Aim To explore and discuss from recent literature the common factors contributing to nurse job satisfaction in the acute hospital setting.Background Nursing dissatisfaction is linked to high rates of nurses leaving the profession, poor morale, poor patient outcomes and increased financial expenditure. Understanding factors that contribute to job satisfaction could increase nurse retention.Evaluation A literature search from January 2004 to March 2009 was conducted using the keywords nursing, (dis)satisfaction, job (dis)satisfaction to identify factors contributing to satisfaction for nurses working in acute hospital settings.Key issues This review identified 44 factors in three clusters (intra-, inter- and extra-personal). Job satisfaction for nurses in acute hospitals can be influenced by a combination of any or all of these factors. Important factors included coping strategies, autonomy, co-worker interaction, direct patient care, organizational policies, resource adequacy and educational opportunities.Conclusions Research suggests that job satisfaction is a complex and multifactorial phenomenon. Collaboration between individual nurses, their managers and others is crucial to increase nursing satisfaction with their job.Implications for nursing management Recognition and regular reviewing by nurse managers of factors that contribute to job satisfaction for nurses working in acute care areas is pivotal to the retention of valued staff.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)804-814
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Nursing Management
Volume18
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2010

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Job Satisfaction
Nurses
Nursing
Organizational Policy
Morale
Nurse Administrators
Health Expenditures
Patient Care
Research

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Hayes, Bronwyn ; Bonner, Ann ; Pryor, Julie. / Factors contributing to nurse job satisfaction in the acute hospital setting : review of recent literature. In: Journal of Nursing Management. 2010 ; Vol. 18, No. 7. pp. 804-814.
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Factors contributing to nurse job satisfaction in the acute hospital setting : review of recent literature. / Hayes, Bronwyn; Bonner, Ann; Pryor, Julie.

In: Journal of Nursing Management, Vol. 18, No. 7, 10.2010, p. 804-814.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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