Field evaluation of Australian wheat genotypes for competitive traits and weed suppression

Research output: Book chapter/Published conference paperConference paper

Abstract

In 2014 and 2015, replicated field trials were performed at commercial paddocks in moderate to low rainfall zones at Wagga Wagga and Condobolin NSW, respectively. In 2014, a total of 11 winter wheat cultivars (Triticum aestivum L.) representing four major breeding family lines grown in Australia were evaluated with 13 cultivars assessed in 2015. At each site, crop and/or weed growth were monitored at various stages of growth: early season (tillering), vegetative, grain filling, harvest and post-harvest. Significant differences between wheat cultivar and location were observed for crop biomass, early vigour, leaf area index (LAI), weed number, weed biomass, canopy architecture and yield in both 2014 and 2015. Differences in weed suppression were largely impacted by crop architecture and phenology early in the growing season. Cultivar competitive traits were also influenced by both genotype and environmental factors, as shown by clear differences in cultivar performance, yield and weed suppression among both locations. Cultivars Condo and Espada were superior performers for yield and weed suppression in both locations and years analysed. This data supports the concept that choice of wheat cultivar can prove to be a cost effective means of weed management.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 20th Australasian Weeds Conference (2016)
Subtitle of host publicationScience, Community and Food Security: the Weed Challenge
EditorsRod Randall, Sandy Lloyd, Catherine Borger
Place of PublicationPerth
PublisherWeed Society of Western Australia
Pages48-53
Number of pages6
ISBN (Electronic)978-0-646-96031-9
Publication statusPublished - 2016
Event20th Australasian Weeds Conference (2016) - Pan Pacific Hotel, Perth, Australia
Duration: 11 Sep 201615 Sep 2016
http://caws.org.au/awc_contents.php?yr=2016 (Conference proceedings)
http://caws.org.nz/old-site/awc_contents.php?yr=2016 (conference website)

Conference

Conference20th Australasian Weeds Conference (2016)
Abbreviated titleScience, Community and Food Security: the Weed Challenge
CountryAustralia
CityPerth
Period11/09/1615/09/16
Internet address

Fingerprint

weed control
wheat
genotype
cultivars
weeds
biomass
tillering
crops
filling period
leaf area index
vigor
winter wheat
phenology
field experimentation
Triticum aestivum
growing season
pastures
developmental stages
canopy
rain

Grant Number

  • GRDC UCS 00020
  • GRDC UCS 00022
  • GRDC UCS 00023

Cite this

Mwendwa, J. M., Brown, W., Haque, K. M. S., Heath, G., Wu, H., Quinn, J., ... Weston, L. A. (2016). Field evaluation of Australian wheat genotypes for competitive traits and weed suppression. In R. Randall, S. Lloyd, & C. Borger (Eds.), Proceedings of the 20th Australasian Weeds Conference (2016): Science, Community and Food Security: the Weed Challenge (pp. 48-53). Perth: Weed Society of Western Australia.
Mwendwa, James M ; Brown, William ; Haque, K M Shamsul ; Heath, Graeme ; Wu, Hanwen ; Quinn, Jane ; Weidenhamer, Jeffrey ; Weston, Leslie A. / Field evaluation of Australian wheat genotypes for competitive traits and weed suppression. Proceedings of the 20th Australasian Weeds Conference (2016): Science, Community and Food Security: the Weed Challenge. editor / Rod Randall ; Sandy Lloyd ; Catherine Borger. Perth : Weed Society of Western Australia, 2016. pp. 48-53
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title = "Field evaluation of Australian wheat genotypes for competitive traits and weed suppression",
abstract = "In 2014 and 2015, replicated field trials were performed at commercial paddocks in moderate to low rainfall zones at Wagga Wagga and Condobolin NSW, respectively. In 2014, a total of 11 winter wheat cultivars (Triticum aestivum L.) representing four major breeding family lines grown in Australia were evaluated with 13 cultivars assessed in 2015. At each site, crop and/or weed growth were monitored at various stages of growth: early season (tillering), vegetative, grain filling, harvest and post-harvest. Significant differences between wheat cultivar and location were observed for crop biomass, early vigour, leaf area index (LAI), weed number, weed biomass, canopy architecture and yield in both 2014 and 2015. Differences in weed suppression were largely impacted by crop architecture and phenology early in the growing season. Cultivar competitive traits were also influenced by both genotype and environmental factors, as shown by clear differences in cultivar performance, yield and weed suppression among both locations. Cultivars Condo and Espada were superior performers for yield and weed suppression in both locations and years analysed. This data supports the concept that choice of wheat cultivar can prove to be a cost effective means of weed management.",
keywords = "Weed suppression, canopy architecture, phenology, propagules, weed seedbank",
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Mwendwa, JM, Brown, W, Haque, KMS, Heath, G, Wu, H, Quinn, J, Weidenhamer, J & Weston, LA 2016, Field evaluation of Australian wheat genotypes for competitive traits and weed suppression. in R Randall, S Lloyd & C Borger (eds), Proceedings of the 20th Australasian Weeds Conference (2016): Science, Community and Food Security: the Weed Challenge. Weed Society of Western Australia, Perth, pp. 48-53, 20th Australasian Weeds Conference (2016), Perth, Australia, 11/09/16.

Field evaluation of Australian wheat genotypes for competitive traits and weed suppression. / Mwendwa, James M; Brown, William; Haque, K M Shamsul; Heath, Graeme; Wu, Hanwen; Quinn, Jane; Weidenhamer, Jeffrey; Weston, Leslie A.

Proceedings of the 20th Australasian Weeds Conference (2016): Science, Community and Food Security: the Weed Challenge. ed. / Rod Randall; Sandy Lloyd; Catherine Borger. Perth : Weed Society of Western Australia, 2016. p. 48-53.

Research output: Book chapter/Published conference paperConference paper

TY - GEN

T1 - Field evaluation of Australian wheat genotypes for competitive traits and weed suppression

AU - Mwendwa, James M

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AU - Heath, Graeme

AU - Wu, Hanwen

AU - Quinn, Jane

AU - Weidenhamer, Jeffrey

AU - Weston, Leslie A.

N1 - Imported on 03 May 2017 - DigiTool details were: publisher = 2016. Event dates (773o) = 11-15 September 2016; Parent title (773t) = Australasian Weeds Conference (AWC).

PY - 2016

Y1 - 2016

N2 - In 2014 and 2015, replicated field trials were performed at commercial paddocks in moderate to low rainfall zones at Wagga Wagga and Condobolin NSW, respectively. In 2014, a total of 11 winter wheat cultivars (Triticum aestivum L.) representing four major breeding family lines grown in Australia were evaluated with 13 cultivars assessed in 2015. At each site, crop and/or weed growth were monitored at various stages of growth: early season (tillering), vegetative, grain filling, harvest and post-harvest. Significant differences between wheat cultivar and location were observed for crop biomass, early vigour, leaf area index (LAI), weed number, weed biomass, canopy architecture and yield in both 2014 and 2015. Differences in weed suppression were largely impacted by crop architecture and phenology early in the growing season. Cultivar competitive traits were also influenced by both genotype and environmental factors, as shown by clear differences in cultivar performance, yield and weed suppression among both locations. Cultivars Condo and Espada were superior performers for yield and weed suppression in both locations and years analysed. This data supports the concept that choice of wheat cultivar can prove to be a cost effective means of weed management.

AB - In 2014 and 2015, replicated field trials were performed at commercial paddocks in moderate to low rainfall zones at Wagga Wagga and Condobolin NSW, respectively. In 2014, a total of 11 winter wheat cultivars (Triticum aestivum L.) representing four major breeding family lines grown in Australia were evaluated with 13 cultivars assessed in 2015. At each site, crop and/or weed growth were monitored at various stages of growth: early season (tillering), vegetative, grain filling, harvest and post-harvest. Significant differences between wheat cultivar and location were observed for crop biomass, early vigour, leaf area index (LAI), weed number, weed biomass, canopy architecture and yield in both 2014 and 2015. Differences in weed suppression were largely impacted by crop architecture and phenology early in the growing season. Cultivar competitive traits were also influenced by both genotype and environmental factors, as shown by clear differences in cultivar performance, yield and weed suppression among both locations. Cultivars Condo and Espada were superior performers for yield and weed suppression in both locations and years analysed. This data supports the concept that choice of wheat cultivar can prove to be a cost effective means of weed management.

KW - Weed suppression, canopy architecture, phenology, propagules, weed seedbank

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BT - Proceedings of the 20th Australasian Weeds Conference (2016)

A2 - Randall, Rod

A2 - Lloyd, Sandy

A2 - Borger, Catherine

PB - Weed Society of Western Australia

CY - Perth

ER -

Mwendwa JM, Brown W, Haque KMS, Heath G, Wu H, Quinn J et al. Field evaluation of Australian wheat genotypes for competitive traits and weed suppression. In Randall R, Lloyd S, Borger C, editors, Proceedings of the 20th Australasian Weeds Conference (2016): Science, Community and Food Security: the Weed Challenge. Perth: Weed Society of Western Australia. 2016. p. 48-53