Flexible adoption of conservation agriculture principles

Practices of care and the management of crop residue in Australian mixed farming systems

Vaughan Higgins, Caroline Love, Tony Dunn

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This paper applies concepts from the sociological literature on ‘practices of care’ to investigate why flexibility is important for farmers in the adoption of conservation agriculture (CA) principles, and, crucially, how farmers integrate CA principles into their existing practices. Drawing on qualitative data from six mixed farming regions in South Eastern Australia, the paper discusses how a specific dimension of CA–crop residue retention–is integrated in the context of biophysical and material challenges, and practices of stubble burning. Farmers viewed burning as increasingly incompatible with their desire to be recognised as good land managers. Yet, shifting to full crop residue retention was perceived as posing challenges for their farming system and compromising farmers’ capacity to manage seasonal variations in pests, weeds and crop residue loads. As a consequence, farmers used burning as a key practice of care to deal in a flexible way with an uncertain and variable farming environment, and to make crop residue retention workable in the context of their farming system. In concluding, the paper argues that the significance of flexibility in farm-level integration of CA principles requires a shift in analytical focus from adoption barriers to practices of care.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)49-59
Number of pages11
JournalInternational Journal of Agricultural Sustainability
Volume17
Issue number1
Early online date20 Dec 2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019

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crop residue management
farming systems
farmers
agriculture
crop residues
stubble
managers
weeds
seasonal variation
Agriculture
Farmers
Farming systems
Conservation
Crop residues
pests
farms

Cite this

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Flexible adoption of conservation agriculture principles : Practices of care and the management of crop residue in Australian mixed farming systems. / Higgins, Vaughan; Love, Caroline; Dunn, Tony.

In: International Journal of Agricultural Sustainability, Vol. 17, No. 1, 2019, p. 49-59.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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