Flexing some Muscle: Strategy and Outcomes in the Queensland Health and Fitness Industry

Glenda Maconachie, Jennifer Sappey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)
1 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

In 1993, contrary to the trend towards enterprise bargaining, and despite an employment environment favouring strong managerial prerogative, a small group of employers in the Queensland commercial health and fitness industry sought industrial regulation through an industry-specific award. A range of factors, including increased competition and unscrupulous profiteers damaging the industry's reputation, triggered the actions as a business strategy. The strategic choices of the employer group, to approach a union to initiate a consent award, are the inverse of behaviours expected under strategic choice theory. This paper argues that organizational size, collective employer action, focus on industry rather than organizational outcomes, and the traditional industrial relations system providing broader impacts, explain their atypical behaviour.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)136-154
Number of pages19
JournalThe Journal of Industrial Relations
Volume55
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2013

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Queensland
Fitness
Health
Industry
Employers
Strategic choice
Organizational outcomes
Factors
Industrial relations
Organizational size
Consent
Choice theory
Business strategy

Cite this

Maconachie, Glenda ; Sappey, Jennifer. / Flexing some Muscle : Strategy and Outcomes in the Queensland Health and Fitness Industry. In: The Journal of Industrial Relations. 2013 ; Vol. 55, No. 1. pp. 136-154.
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Flexing some Muscle : Strategy and Outcomes in the Queensland Health and Fitness Industry. / Maconachie, Glenda; Sappey, Jennifer.

In: The Journal of Industrial Relations, Vol. 55, No. 1, 02.2013, p. 136-154.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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