Floods after bushfires: Rapid responses for reducing impacts of sediment, ash, and nutrient slugs

Jason Alexandra, C. Max Finlayson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Australia’s mega-fires of 2019–2020 have burnt over ten millions of hectares 1 – almost twice the size of the 2019 Amazon fires (; Woodward 2020). Forested mountain ranges across the country – the sources of many significant rivers – including from Eastern Victoria to South-East Queensland have burnt.Destructive mega-fires are increasing globally, requiring us to rethink how we live in flammable landscapes (Moritz et al. 2014; Pyne 2018). We know from experience in Australia that major fires are ‘resetting’ events for communities (Teague, McLeod, and Pascoe 2010;Griffiths 2016) and ecosystems (Adams 2013; Keenan and Nitschke 2016). These fires may also trigger the resetting of national climate policies (both adaptation and mitigation), given that they have sparked a fierce national debate about climate change and its impacts
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)9-11
Number of pages3
JournalAustralian Journal of Water Resources
Volume24
Issue number1
Early online date20 Jan 2020
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2020

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