For whom the bell tolls: Practitioners’ views on bell-ringing practice in contemporary society in new South Wales (Australia)

Murray Parker, Dirk H.R. Spennemann

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

For centuries, religious buildings have been using bells to call the faithful to prayer. Bell-ringing activity on church premises does not serve a purely religious function, however, as people in the community may perceive this activity secularly, attributing their own meanings and significances towards these sounds. If bell ringing (or the actual sound) were found to have great significance to a specific community, denomination, or a regionality bracket, this may have future implications in any management of these resources. There is a need to hear the voices of the actual practitioners and their perceptions regarding what they, their congregations, and their host communities feel. This paper represents the first large-scale assessment of the views of practitioners of five major Christian denominations with regards to bell-ringing practice and its role in contemporary society.
Original languageEnglish
Article number425
Pages (from-to)1-24
Number of pages24
JournalReligions
Volume11
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2020

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'For whom the bell tolls: Practitioners’ views on bell-ringing practice in contemporary society in new South Wales (Australia)'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this