Foraging ecology of the Black-fronted Plover on saline lagoons in Australia: the importance of receding water levels

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)
11 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

The conditions that determine habitat suitability for waterbirds on temporary wetlands in Australia are poorly understood. This study describes the foraging behavior of the Black-fronted Plover (Elseyornis melanops) on two shallow saline lagoons with variable water depths. When water levels were receding, areas were left exposed around the periphery of the lagoons, which formed a succession from substrates still covered by water, to wet mud with a surface layer of water, to moist firm mud and eventually to dry, hard mud. The plovers showed a strong preference for feeding in areas of moist, firm mud and their prey capture rates were highest in this substrate type. When water levels rose following rainfall, previously exposed areas were partially flooded and the birds' prey capture rates fell significantly. Most abandoned the lagoon. The species was thus highly dependent on receding water levels to provide suitable foraging conditions.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)270-276
Number of pages7
JournalWaterbirds
Volume27
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2004

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Foraging ecology of the Black-fronted Plover on saline lagoons in Australia: the importance of receding water levels'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this