From ‘Attraction Points’ Towards Retention: What do We Know about International Immigrants Who Come to Stay in Non-Metropolitan Australia?

Research output: Other contribution to conferenceOther

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Abstract

This presentation is based on the results of the longitudinal survey of almost 1,000 new immigrants in regional and rural Australia (Collins and Krivokapic-Skoko, 2011). The survey was designed to answer the questions of what it would take to keep the new immigrants in small regional townships and rural areas. The main topics covered by this survey were: (a) migrant decisions and mobility, (b) labour market experience, (c) migrant satisfaction and (d) community participation. We also selected five regional and rural towns in New South Wales and Western Australia with a significant number of new immigrants for closer fieldwork involving interviews with new immigrants, key business, government and community stakeholders and long-term residents.
Original languageEnglish
Pages17-19
Number of pages3
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2018
EventRural and Regional Mobilities: Exploring the Impact of (Im)mobilities in Rural and Regional Communities - Hawke EU Centre for Mobilities, Migrations and Cultural Transformations, Mount Gambier, Australia
Duration: 26 Sep 201726 Sep 2017

Workshop

WorkshopRural and Regional Mobilities
CountryAustralia
CityMount Gambier
Period26/09/1726/09/17

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@conference{2e10012a2fb74230aae2759efcbe19bb,
title = "From ‘Attraction Points’ Towards Retention: What do We Know about International Immigrants Who Come to Stay in Non-Metropolitan Australia?",
abstract = "This presentation is based on the results of the longitudinal survey of almost 1,000 new immigrants in regional and rural Australia (Collins and Krivokapic-Skoko, 2011). The survey was designed to answer the questions of what it would take to keep the new immigrants in small regional townships and rural areas. The main topics covered by this survey were: (a) migrant decisions and mobility, (b) labour market experience, (c) migrant satisfaction and (d) community participation. We also selected five regional and rural towns in New South Wales and Western Australia with a significant number of new immigrants for closer fieldwork involving interviews with new immigrants, key business, government and community stakeholders and long-term residents.",
author = "Branka Krivokapic-Skoko and Jock Collins",
year = "2018",
month = "4",
language = "English",
pages = "17--19",
note = "Rural and Regional Mobilities : Exploring the Impact of (Im)mobilities in Rural and Regional Communities ; Conference date: 26-09-2017 Through 26-09-2017",

}

Krivokapic-Skoko, B & Collins, J 2018, 'From ‘Attraction Points’ Towards Retention: What do We Know about International Immigrants Who Come to Stay in Non-Metropolitan Australia?' Rural and Regional Mobilities, Mount Gambier, Australia, 26/09/17 - 26/09/17, pp. 17-19.

From ‘Attraction Points’ Towards Retention : What do We Know about International Immigrants Who Come to Stay in Non-Metropolitan Australia? / Krivokapic-Skoko, Branka; Collins, Jock.

2018. 17-19 Rural and Regional Mobilities, Mount Gambier, Australia.

Research output: Other contribution to conferenceOther

TY - CONF

T1 - From ‘Attraction Points’ Towards Retention

T2 - What do We Know about International Immigrants Who Come to Stay in Non-Metropolitan Australia?

AU - Krivokapic-Skoko, Branka

AU - Collins, Jock

PY - 2018/4

Y1 - 2018/4

N2 - This presentation is based on the results of the longitudinal survey of almost 1,000 new immigrants in regional and rural Australia (Collins and Krivokapic-Skoko, 2011). The survey was designed to answer the questions of what it would take to keep the new immigrants in small regional townships and rural areas. The main topics covered by this survey were: (a) migrant decisions and mobility, (b) labour market experience, (c) migrant satisfaction and (d) community participation. We also selected five regional and rural towns in New South Wales and Western Australia with a significant number of new immigrants for closer fieldwork involving interviews with new immigrants, key business, government and community stakeholders and long-term residents.

AB - This presentation is based on the results of the longitudinal survey of almost 1,000 new immigrants in regional and rural Australia (Collins and Krivokapic-Skoko, 2011). The survey was designed to answer the questions of what it would take to keep the new immigrants in small regional townships and rural areas. The main topics covered by this survey were: (a) migrant decisions and mobility, (b) labour market experience, (c) migrant satisfaction and (d) community participation. We also selected five regional and rural towns in New South Wales and Western Australia with a significant number of new immigrants for closer fieldwork involving interviews with new immigrants, key business, government and community stakeholders and long-term residents.

M3 - Other

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ER -