From 'Doing' to 'Knowing': Becoming academic

Catherine Seymour

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In this article I present an overview of my observations and experiences as a 'new' academic, and reflect upon these within the broader context of theorizing about power, knowledge and expertise. There are, I believe, connections to be drawn between my experiences-of my discomfort with the identity 'academic' and my struggles to recognize myself as an academic-and conventional understandings of what properly constitutes credible and reputable academic knowledge. Although this is, at least in part, a profoundly personal exercise in reflection, it has wider implications in terms of the intersections between academia and professional practice, which, I argue, are critical to the future viability of social work as a strong, dynamic and distinct profession.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)459-469
Number of pages11
JournalQualitative Social Work
Volume5
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2006

Fingerprint

Professional Practice
Social Work
future viability
experience
social work
expertise
profession

Cite this

Seymour, Catherine. / From 'Doing' to 'Knowing' : Becoming academic. In: Qualitative Social Work. 2006 ; Vol. 5, No. 4. pp. 459-469.
@article{af3a56dcc5814a6581ce8ccf81ac173a,
title = "From 'Doing' to 'Knowing': Becoming academic",
abstract = "In this article I present an overview of my observations and experiences as a 'new' academic, and reflect upon these within the broader context of theorizing about power, knowledge and expertise. There are, I believe, connections to be drawn between my experiences-of my discomfort with the identity 'academic' and my struggles to recognize myself as an academic-and conventional understandings of what properly constitutes credible and reputable academic knowledge. Although this is, at least in part, a profoundly personal exercise in reflection, it has wider implications in terms of the intersections between academia and professional practice, which, I argue, are critical to the future viability of social work as a strong, dynamic and distinct profession.",
author = "Catherine Seymour",
note = "Imported on 12 Apr 2017 - DigiTool details were: Journal title (773t) = Qualitative Social Work: research and practice. ISSNs: 1473-3250;",
year = "2006",
doi = "10.1177/1473325006070289",
language = "English",
volume = "5",
pages = "459--469",
journal = "Qualitative Social Work",
issn = "1473-3250",
publisher = "SAGE Publications Inc.",
number = "4",

}

From 'Doing' to 'Knowing' : Becoming academic. / Seymour, Catherine.

In: Qualitative Social Work, Vol. 5, No. 4, 2006, p. 459-469.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - From 'Doing' to 'Knowing'

T2 - Becoming academic

AU - Seymour, Catherine

N1 - Imported on 12 Apr 2017 - DigiTool details were: Journal title (773t) = Qualitative Social Work: research and practice. ISSNs: 1473-3250;

PY - 2006

Y1 - 2006

N2 - In this article I present an overview of my observations and experiences as a 'new' academic, and reflect upon these within the broader context of theorizing about power, knowledge and expertise. There are, I believe, connections to be drawn between my experiences-of my discomfort with the identity 'academic' and my struggles to recognize myself as an academic-and conventional understandings of what properly constitutes credible and reputable academic knowledge. Although this is, at least in part, a profoundly personal exercise in reflection, it has wider implications in terms of the intersections between academia and professional practice, which, I argue, are critical to the future viability of social work as a strong, dynamic and distinct profession.

AB - In this article I present an overview of my observations and experiences as a 'new' academic, and reflect upon these within the broader context of theorizing about power, knowledge and expertise. There are, I believe, connections to be drawn between my experiences-of my discomfort with the identity 'academic' and my struggles to recognize myself as an academic-and conventional understandings of what properly constitutes credible and reputable academic knowledge. Although this is, at least in part, a profoundly personal exercise in reflection, it has wider implications in terms of the intersections between academia and professional practice, which, I argue, are critical to the future viability of social work as a strong, dynamic and distinct profession.

U2 - 10.1177/1473325006070289

DO - 10.1177/1473325006070289

M3 - Article

VL - 5

SP - 459

EP - 469

JO - Qualitative Social Work

JF - Qualitative Social Work

SN - 1473-3250

IS - 4

ER -