From sensory to social: the information that impacts animal foraging decisions

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Foraging decisions reflect cost-benefit trade-offs. Costs arise from missed opportunities, ingestion (such as if prey are toxic), and acquisition (time and energy through exploration). Benefits arise from acquiring energy, nutrients and information. I present a collection of recent findings from vertebrates and invertebrates, demonstrating the breadth of information – sensory, social, nutritional, spatial and physiological, to name a few – that impacts animal foraging decisions. I also consider key challenges facing the study of foraging cognition, namely misgivings arising from observations of suboptimal foraging decisions in laboratory studies, and a lack of transferability between information use in the laboratory and that in the world. I conclude that an emphasis on custom experimental designs is key to continued empirical progress in the field.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)93-99
Number of pages7
JournalCurrent Opinion in Behavioral Sciences
Volume16
Early online dateMay 2017
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01 Aug 2017

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Poisons
Invertebrates
Cognition
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Names
Vertebrates
Research Design
Eating
Costs and Cost Analysis
Food

Cite this

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From sensory to social : the information that impacts animal foraging decisions. / Sulikowski, Danielle.

In: Current Opinion in Behavioral Sciences, Vol. 16, 01.08.2017, p. 93-99.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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