Good practice in apprenticeship systems: Evidence from an international study

Erica Smith, Roslin Brennan Kemmis

    Research output: Book chapter/Published conference paperConference paperpeer-review

    Abstract

    Apprenticeships can be seen as the ultimate in co-operation between TVET providers and industry as they are based on a combination of work and study. Ideally they should provide appropriate skills for companies and also all-round occupational and generic skills. However there are many different actual and potential models of apprenticeship.This paper uses part of the work undertaken for a project funded by the International Labor Organization and the World Bank to compare and contrast apprenticeship systems in 11 countries, for the purpose of drawing out features of good practice. The project was undertaken to provide suggestions for the process of reform of the Indian apprenticeship system [Planning Commission 2009].Experiences of other countries, both in the developed and the developing world,indicate that apprenticeship systems cannot be transplanted among countries; however, key features of countries' systems can be identified and sensitively developed in other countries. The paper describes a method for undertaking this task, and the findings. Eleven individual country case studies, based on reports and literature, were produced by a team of national experts, and subjected to a cross-case analysis. The use of national experts was judged to be more effective than having people write on other countries' systems; the latter method has proved in many instances to result in inaccurate reports, susceptibility to the influence of limited numbers of stakeholders and a lack of sophistication in analysing trends. The country case studies took into account agreed international benchmarks for describing, analysing and evaluating apprenticeships, based on the framework described in the recently-released memorandum by INAP, the International Network on Innovative Apprenticeship [INAP Commission 2012] and the framework developed by one of the authors in the International Encyclopedia of Education[Smith 2010]. The countries were selected to cover a range of variables.A cross-case analysis was undertaken which drew together data from the countries using a thematic approach and simple data display techniques [Miles and Huberman 1994].The analysis covered both systemic issues and 'the life cycle of the apprentice'. The data were then further reduced to develop an identification of the features of a model apprenticeship system, and proposed measures of success and associated challenges, derived from the data.
    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publication2nd UPI International Conference on TVET
    EditorsJoachim Dittrich, Ade Gafar Abdullah
    Place of PublicationIndonesia
    PublisherFaculty of Technology and Vocational Education
    Pages47-57
    Number of pages11
    Publication statusPublished - 2013
    EventUPI International Conference on Technical and Vocational Education and Training Collaboration in Technical and Vocational Education and Training - Bandung, Indonesia, Indonesia
    Duration: 04 Dec 201205 Dec 2012

    Conference

    ConferenceUPI International Conference on Technical and Vocational Education and Training Collaboration in Technical and Vocational Education and Training
    Country/TerritoryIndonesia
    Period04/12/1205/12/12

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