Grapevine bunch rots

Impacts on wine composition and quality and possible procedures for the removal of wine faults.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

55 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Bunch rot of grape berries causes economic loss to grape and wine production worldwide. The organismsresponsible are largely filamentous fungi, the most common of these being Botrytis cinerea (gray mold); however, there are arange of other fungi responsible for the rotting of grapes such as Aspergillus spp., Penicillium spp., and fungi found in subtropicalclimates (e.g., Colletotrichum spp. (ripe rot) and Greeneria uvicola (bitter rot)). A further group more commonly associated withdiseases of the vegetative tissues of the vine can also infect grape berries (e.g., Botryosphaeriaceae, Phomopsis viticola). Theimpact these fungi have on wine quality is poorly understood as are remedial practices in the winery to minimize wine faults.Compounds found in bunch rot affected grapes and wine are typically described as having mushroom, earthy odors and includegeosmin, 2-methylisoborneol, 1-octen-3-ol, 2-octen-1-ol, fenchol, and fenchone. This review examines the current state ofknowledge about bunch rot of grapes and how this plant disease complex affects wine chemistry. Current wine industry practicesto minimize wine faults and gaps in our understanding of how grape bunch rot diseases affect wine production and quality arealso identified.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)5189-5205
Number of pages17
JournalJournal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry
Volume61
Issue number22
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2013

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Wine
Vitis
wines
grapes
Fungi
Chemical analysis
fungi
Diaporthe ampelina
2-methylisoborneol
Fruit
Botryosphaeriaceae
octenol
wine industry
Colletotrichum
wine quality
Botrytis
Plant Diseases
plant diseases and disorders
Botrytis cinerea
Aspergillus

Cite this

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title = "Grapevine bunch rots: Impacts on wine composition and quality and possible procedures for the removal of wine faults.",
abstract = "Bunch rot of grape berries causes economic loss to grape and wine production worldwide. The organismsresponsible are largely filamentous fungi, the most common of these being Botrytis cinerea (gray mold); however, there are arange of other fungi responsible for the rotting of grapes such as Aspergillus spp., Penicillium spp., and fungi found in subtropicalclimates (e.g., Colletotrichum spp. (ripe rot) and Greeneria uvicola (bitter rot)). A further group more commonly associated withdiseases of the vegetative tissues of the vine can also infect grape berries (e.g., Botryosphaeriaceae, Phomopsis viticola). Theimpact these fungi have on wine quality is poorly understood as are remedial practices in the winery to minimize wine faults.Compounds found in bunch rot affected grapes and wine are typically described as having mushroom, earthy odors and includegeosmin, 2-methylisoborneol, 1-octen-3-ol, 2-octen-1-ol, fenchol, and fenchone. This review examines the current state ofknowledge about bunch rot of grapes and how this plant disease complex affects wine chemistry. Current wine industry practicesto minimize wine faults and gaps in our understanding of how grape bunch rot diseases affect wine production and quality arealso identified.",
keywords = "Fining agents, Fungal rot, Mycotoxin, Off-flavor, Vitis vinifera, Wine quality",
author = "Christopher Steel and John Blackman and Leigh Schmidtke",
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AU - Steel, Christopher

AU - Blackman, John

AU - Schmidtke, Leigh

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N2 - Bunch rot of grape berries causes economic loss to grape and wine production worldwide. The organismsresponsible are largely filamentous fungi, the most common of these being Botrytis cinerea (gray mold); however, there are arange of other fungi responsible for the rotting of grapes such as Aspergillus spp., Penicillium spp., and fungi found in subtropicalclimates (e.g., Colletotrichum spp. (ripe rot) and Greeneria uvicola (bitter rot)). A further group more commonly associated withdiseases of the vegetative tissues of the vine can also infect grape berries (e.g., Botryosphaeriaceae, Phomopsis viticola). Theimpact these fungi have on wine quality is poorly understood as are remedial practices in the winery to minimize wine faults.Compounds found in bunch rot affected grapes and wine are typically described as having mushroom, earthy odors and includegeosmin, 2-methylisoborneol, 1-octen-3-ol, 2-octen-1-ol, fenchol, and fenchone. This review examines the current state ofknowledge about bunch rot of grapes and how this plant disease complex affects wine chemistry. Current wine industry practicesto minimize wine faults and gaps in our understanding of how grape bunch rot diseases affect wine production and quality arealso identified.

AB - Bunch rot of grape berries causes economic loss to grape and wine production worldwide. The organismsresponsible are largely filamentous fungi, the most common of these being Botrytis cinerea (gray mold); however, there are arange of other fungi responsible for the rotting of grapes such as Aspergillus spp., Penicillium spp., and fungi found in subtropicalclimates (e.g., Colletotrichum spp. (ripe rot) and Greeneria uvicola (bitter rot)). A further group more commonly associated withdiseases of the vegetative tissues of the vine can also infect grape berries (e.g., Botryosphaeriaceae, Phomopsis viticola). Theimpact these fungi have on wine quality is poorly understood as are remedial practices in the winery to minimize wine faults.Compounds found in bunch rot affected grapes and wine are typically described as having mushroom, earthy odors and includegeosmin, 2-methylisoborneol, 1-octen-3-ol, 2-octen-1-ol, fenchol, and fenchone. This review examines the current state ofknowledge about bunch rot of grapes and how this plant disease complex affects wine chemistry. Current wine industry practicesto minimize wine faults and gaps in our understanding of how grape bunch rot diseases affect wine production and quality arealso identified.

KW - Fining agents

KW - Fungal rot

KW - Mycotoxin

KW - Off-flavor

KW - Vitis vinifera

KW - Wine quality

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