Grazing management and pasture innovations: what's best for your farming system?

Research output: Book chapter/Published conference paperConference paper

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Abstract

Increasing and maintaining higher levels of productivity from our pastures which are being utilised in the most profitable way is still and will continue to be one of the highest priorities of producers involved in extensive large animal production. There is a broad range of technologies and strategies available to change the composition of pastures and the whole farms pasture base in an attempt to increase long term production and profit. But identifying the optimal farm development path over the long term is difficult given the complexity of the farming system within a multidimensional landscape. The impact of labour constraints and costs, the degree of capital invested and the timing, riskiness and persistency of returns are critical to the economic efficiency of a technology, as is its interaction with current and future pasture and livestock production, and the long term environmental impacts. The optimal grazing management system or rotation intensity would be expected to balance botanical stability and animal production while not being onerous in the need for additional labour or capital. The broad array of investment alternatives for the development of the farm, such as grazing management, pasture improvement or increasing soil fertility, that may be adopted demands a strong need for managers to improve their knowledge of how the different options interact to determine not only pasture, livestock and economic outcomes, but also environmental. The optimal development path for each individual property and business will vary depending on the inherent landscape of the property, the state of the current pasture base and infrastructure, the livestock enterprises operating, the level of capital and/or labour constraints, and the risk adversity of the business managers.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 20th Annual Conference of the Grasslands Society of NSW
EditorsHaydn Lloyd Davies
Place of PublicationOrange
PublisherThe Grasslands Society of NSW
Pages69-74
Number of pages6
ISBN (Electronic)0734716532
Publication statusPublished - 2005
EventGrass Roots & All - Orange NSW, Australia
Duration: 19 Jul 200521 Jul 2005

Conference

ConferenceGrass Roots & All
CountryAustralia
Period19/07/0521/07/05

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grazing management
farming systems
pastures
labor
animal production
farms
managers
livestock
economics
livestock production
infrastructure
profits and margins
management systems
soil fertility
environmental impact

Cite this

Behrendt, K. (2005). Grazing management and pasture innovations: what's best for your farming system? In H. L. Davies (Ed.), Proceedings of the 20th Annual Conference of the Grasslands Society of NSW (pp. 69-74). Orange: The Grasslands Society of NSW.
Behrendt, Karl. / Grazing management and pasture innovations : what's best for your farming system?. Proceedings of the 20th Annual Conference of the Grasslands Society of NSW. editor / Haydn Lloyd Davies. Orange : The Grasslands Society of NSW, 2005. pp. 69-74
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Behrendt, K 2005, Grazing management and pasture innovations: what's best for your farming system? in HL Davies (ed.), Proceedings of the 20th Annual Conference of the Grasslands Society of NSW. The Grasslands Society of NSW, Orange, pp. 69-74, Grass Roots & All, Australia, 19/07/05.

Grazing management and pasture innovations : what's best for your farming system? / Behrendt, Karl.

Proceedings of the 20th Annual Conference of the Grasslands Society of NSW. ed. / Haydn Lloyd Davies. Orange : The Grasslands Society of NSW, 2005. p. 69-74.

Research output: Book chapter/Published conference paperConference paper

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Behrendt K. Grazing management and pasture innovations: what's best for your farming system? In Davies HL, editor, Proceedings of the 20th Annual Conference of the Grasslands Society of NSW. Orange: The Grasslands Society of NSW. 2005. p. 69-74