Has Bartel resolved the gamer's dilemma?

Morgan Luck, Nathan Ellerby

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)
17 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

In this paper we consider whether Christopher Bartel has resolved the gamer's dilemma. The gamer's dilemma highlights a discrepancy in our moral judgements about the permissibility of performing certain actions in computer games. Many gamers have the intuition that virtual murder is permissible in computer games, whereas virtual paedophilia is not. Yet finding a relevant moral distinction to ground such intuitions can be difficult. Bartel suggests a relevant moral distinction may turn on the notion that virtual paedophilia harms women in a way that virtual murder does not. We argue that this distinction is only in a position to provide a partial solution to the dilemma.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)229-233
Number of pages5
JournalEthics and Information Technology
Volume15
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2013

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Computer games
pedophilia
computer game
intuition
homicide
moral judgement

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Luck, Morgan ; Ellerby, Nathan. / Has Bartel resolved the gamer's dilemma?. In: Ethics and Information Technology. 2013 ; Vol. 15, No. 3. pp. 229-233.
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Has Bartel resolved the gamer's dilemma? / Luck, Morgan; Ellerby, Nathan.

In: Ethics and Information Technology, Vol. 15, No. 3, 09.2013, p. 229-233.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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