Health and fitness status of Australian paramedics: A Cause for Concern

Jayden Hunter, Alexander MacQuarrie, Samantha Sheridan, Richard High, Carolyn Waite, Kirsty Smith, Janelle Thomas, Janelle Wheat

Research output: Other contribution to conferenceAbstract

186 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Purpose: Paramedics are among the most frequently injured health professionals in Australia, performing duties that require awkward and heavy manual handling tasks interspersed with periods of sedentary behaviour throughout a shift. However, few data are available on health and fitness profiles or how to monitor and facilitate paramedic fitness levels to reduce occupational injury risk. Methods: A group of regional Australian paramedics (n=140; 78 male; mean±SD 37.6±10.2 years; BMI 28.5±5.5 kg/m2) underwent health and fitness assessment. Measures included resting blood pressure (BP; Omron HEM-7322, Japan), body composition (body fat % by bioelectrical impedance; Inner Scan V, Tanita, Japan), upper, lower and core-body muscular strength (maximum push-ups (modified for females), single-leg (SL) wall squat (total of left and right; sec) and prone plank hold; sec) and flexibility (sit and reach; cm). Outcomes were compared between sex using multivariate ANOVA and against ACSM norms. Results: Males had higher mean BP vs. females (p<0.01): 136 (95% CI 133-139)/86 (84-89) mmHg vs. 122 (118-126)/80 (77-83) mmHg (both pre-hypertensive); less body fat (p<0.001): 23.6 (95% CI 21.6-25.5) % (poor) vs. 35.0 (32.6-37.3) % (very poor); greater upper body strength (p<0.05; push-ups): 23 (20-25) (very good) vs. 18 (14-21) (good); similar lower body strength (SL wall squat): 35.2 (29.5-40.9) sec vs. 29.0 (22.2-35.7) sec (both below average); similar core strength (plank hold): 88.0 (77.6-98.4) sec (average) vs. 74.0 (61.6-86.5) sec (below average); and less flexibility (p<0.01; sit and reach): 20.4 (17.9-22.9) cm (poor) vs. 27.4 (24.4-30.4) cm (fair). Conclusion: Insufficient core and lower body strength and flexibility coupled with demanding manual handling tasks may increase the risk of work-related musculoskeletal injuries in paramedics. High body fat and pre-hypertensive BP levels suggest increased cardiometabolic disease risk in this population.
Original languageEnglish
Pages1-1
Number of pages1
Publication statusPublished - 20 Sep 2018
EventHealth, Wellness & Society Conference - Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom
Duration: 20 Sep 201821 Sep 2018
http://healthandsociety.com/2018-conference
https://healthandsociety.com/assets/downloads/health/W18FinalProgram.pdf (conference program)

Conference

ConferenceHealth, Wellness & Society Conference
CountryUnited Kingdom
CityLondon
Period20/09/1821/09/18
Internet address

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Allied Health Personnel
Health Status
Adipose Tissue
Leg
Japan
Health
Occupational Injuries
Body Composition
Electric Impedance
Analysis of Variance
Blood Pressure
Wounds and Injuries
Population

Cite this

Hunter, J., MacQuarrie, A., Sheridan, S., High, R., Waite, C., Smith, K., ... Wheat, J. (2018). Health and fitness status of Australian paramedics: A Cause for Concern. 1-1. Abstract from Health, Wellness & Society Conference, London, United Kingdom.
Hunter, Jayden ; MacQuarrie, Alexander ; Sheridan, Samantha ; High, Richard ; Waite, Carolyn ; Smith, Kirsty ; Thomas, Janelle ; Wheat, Janelle. / Health and fitness status of Australian paramedics : A Cause for Concern. Abstract from Health, Wellness & Society Conference, London, United Kingdom.1 p.
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abstract = "Purpose: Paramedics are among the most frequently injured health professionals in Australia, performing duties that require awkward and heavy manual handling tasks interspersed with periods of sedentary behaviour throughout a shift. However, few data are available on health and fitness profiles or how to monitor and facilitate paramedic fitness levels to reduce occupational injury risk. Methods: A group of regional Australian paramedics (n=140; 78 male; mean±SD 37.6±10.2 years; BMI 28.5±5.5 kg/m2) underwent health and fitness assessment. Measures included resting blood pressure (BP; Omron HEM-7322, Japan), body composition (body fat {\%} by bioelectrical impedance; Inner Scan V, Tanita, Japan), upper, lower and core-body muscular strength (maximum push-ups (modified for females), single-leg (SL) wall squat (total of left and right; sec) and prone plank hold; sec) and flexibility (sit and reach; cm). Outcomes were compared between sex using multivariate ANOVA and against ACSM norms. Results: Males had higher mean BP vs. females (p<0.01): 136 (95{\%} CI 133-139)/86 (84-89) mmHg vs. 122 (118-126)/80 (77-83) mmHg (both pre-hypertensive); less body fat (p<0.001): 23.6 (95{\%} CI 21.6-25.5) {\%} (poor) vs. 35.0 (32.6-37.3) {\%} (very poor); greater upper body strength (p<0.05; push-ups): 23 (20-25) (very good) vs. 18 (14-21) (good); similar lower body strength (SL wall squat): 35.2 (29.5-40.9) sec vs. 29.0 (22.2-35.7) sec (both below average); similar core strength (plank hold): 88.0 (77.6-98.4) sec (average) vs. 74.0 (61.6-86.5) sec (below average); and less flexibility (p<0.01; sit and reach): 20.4 (17.9-22.9) cm (poor) vs. 27.4 (24.4-30.4) cm (fair). Conclusion: Insufficient core and lower body strength and flexibility coupled with demanding manual handling tasks may increase the risk of work-related musculoskeletal injuries in paramedics. High body fat and pre-hypertensive BP levels suggest increased cardiometabolic disease risk in this population.",
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year = "2018",
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Hunter, J, MacQuarrie, A, Sheridan, S, High, R, Waite, C, Smith, K, Thomas, J & Wheat, J 2018, 'Health and fitness status of Australian paramedics: A Cause for Concern', Health, Wellness & Society Conference, London, United Kingdom, 20/09/18 - 21/09/18 pp. 1-1.

Health and fitness status of Australian paramedics : A Cause for Concern. / Hunter, Jayden; MacQuarrie, Alexander; Sheridan, Samantha; High, Richard; Waite, Carolyn; Smith, Kirsty; Thomas, Janelle; Wheat, Janelle.

2018. 1-1 Abstract from Health, Wellness & Society Conference, London, United Kingdom.

Research output: Other contribution to conferenceAbstract

TY - CONF

T1 - Health and fitness status of Australian paramedics

T2 - A Cause for Concern

AU - Hunter, Jayden

AU - MacQuarrie, Alexander

AU - Sheridan, Samantha

AU - High, Richard

AU - Waite, Carolyn

AU - Smith, Kirsty

AU - Thomas, Janelle

AU - Wheat, Janelle

PY - 2018/9/20

Y1 - 2018/9/20

N2 - Purpose: Paramedics are among the most frequently injured health professionals in Australia, performing duties that require awkward and heavy manual handling tasks interspersed with periods of sedentary behaviour throughout a shift. However, few data are available on health and fitness profiles or how to monitor and facilitate paramedic fitness levels to reduce occupational injury risk. Methods: A group of regional Australian paramedics (n=140; 78 male; mean±SD 37.6±10.2 years; BMI 28.5±5.5 kg/m2) underwent health and fitness assessment. Measures included resting blood pressure (BP; Omron HEM-7322, Japan), body composition (body fat % by bioelectrical impedance; Inner Scan V, Tanita, Japan), upper, lower and core-body muscular strength (maximum push-ups (modified for females), single-leg (SL) wall squat (total of left and right; sec) and prone plank hold; sec) and flexibility (sit and reach; cm). Outcomes were compared between sex using multivariate ANOVA and against ACSM norms. Results: Males had higher mean BP vs. females (p<0.01): 136 (95% CI 133-139)/86 (84-89) mmHg vs. 122 (118-126)/80 (77-83) mmHg (both pre-hypertensive); less body fat (p<0.001): 23.6 (95% CI 21.6-25.5) % (poor) vs. 35.0 (32.6-37.3) % (very poor); greater upper body strength (p<0.05; push-ups): 23 (20-25) (very good) vs. 18 (14-21) (good); similar lower body strength (SL wall squat): 35.2 (29.5-40.9) sec vs. 29.0 (22.2-35.7) sec (both below average); similar core strength (plank hold): 88.0 (77.6-98.4) sec (average) vs. 74.0 (61.6-86.5) sec (below average); and less flexibility (p<0.01; sit and reach): 20.4 (17.9-22.9) cm (poor) vs. 27.4 (24.4-30.4) cm (fair). Conclusion: Insufficient core and lower body strength and flexibility coupled with demanding manual handling tasks may increase the risk of work-related musculoskeletal injuries in paramedics. High body fat and pre-hypertensive BP levels suggest increased cardiometabolic disease risk in this population.

AB - Purpose: Paramedics are among the most frequently injured health professionals in Australia, performing duties that require awkward and heavy manual handling tasks interspersed with periods of sedentary behaviour throughout a shift. However, few data are available on health and fitness profiles or how to monitor and facilitate paramedic fitness levels to reduce occupational injury risk. Methods: A group of regional Australian paramedics (n=140; 78 male; mean±SD 37.6±10.2 years; BMI 28.5±5.5 kg/m2) underwent health and fitness assessment. Measures included resting blood pressure (BP; Omron HEM-7322, Japan), body composition (body fat % by bioelectrical impedance; Inner Scan V, Tanita, Japan), upper, lower and core-body muscular strength (maximum push-ups (modified for females), single-leg (SL) wall squat (total of left and right; sec) and prone plank hold; sec) and flexibility (sit and reach; cm). Outcomes were compared between sex using multivariate ANOVA and against ACSM norms. Results: Males had higher mean BP vs. females (p<0.01): 136 (95% CI 133-139)/86 (84-89) mmHg vs. 122 (118-126)/80 (77-83) mmHg (both pre-hypertensive); less body fat (p<0.001): 23.6 (95% CI 21.6-25.5) % (poor) vs. 35.0 (32.6-37.3) % (very poor); greater upper body strength (p<0.05; push-ups): 23 (20-25) (very good) vs. 18 (14-21) (good); similar lower body strength (SL wall squat): 35.2 (29.5-40.9) sec vs. 29.0 (22.2-35.7) sec (both below average); similar core strength (plank hold): 88.0 (77.6-98.4) sec (average) vs. 74.0 (61.6-86.5) sec (below average); and less flexibility (p<0.01; sit and reach): 20.4 (17.9-22.9) cm (poor) vs. 27.4 (24.4-30.4) cm (fair). Conclusion: Insufficient core and lower body strength and flexibility coupled with demanding manual handling tasks may increase the risk of work-related musculoskeletal injuries in paramedics. High body fat and pre-hypertensive BP levels suggest increased cardiometabolic disease risk in this population.

M3 - Abstract

SP - 1

EP - 1

ER -

Hunter J, MacQuarrie A, Sheridan S, High R, Waite C, Smith K et al. Health and fitness status of Australian paramedics: A Cause for Concern. 2018. Abstract from Health, Wellness & Society Conference, London, United Kingdom.