Helping students understand their learning styles: Effects on study self'efficacy, preference for group work, and group climate

Graham D. Hendry, Paul Heinrich, Patricia M. Lyon, Alexandra L. Barratt, Judy M. Simpson, Sarah J. Hyde, Shalinie Gonsalkorale, Michelle Hyde, Sara Mgaieth

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Small tutorial groups in higher education are often composed without regard to students' gender or broad knowledge background, for example, yet research indicates that composing groups on the basis of gender and prior qualifications may have significant effects on assessment outcomes. Previous studies have also investigated the effects of composing groups on the basis of learning style preference and found no effects. The effect of combining group composition with training in learning styles is unclear, however. In this study we report on the effects of workshop training in learning styles on balanced group members' study self-efficacy, preference for group work, group climate, and assessment performance. Although we found no effects, students reported greater self-awareness of their own learning and acceptance of others' styles. We conclude that in collaborative learning environments, training may need to go beyond facilitating growth in students' self-awareness to include a focus on how to apply this understanding to improving group function and helping others to learn.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)395-407
Number of pages13
JournalEducational Psychology
Volume25
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2005

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