How low can they go when going with the flow? Tolerance of egg and larval fishes to rapid decompression

Craig Boys, Wayne Robinson, Brett Miller, Brett Pflugrath, Lee Baumgartner, Anna Navarro Cuenca, Richard Brown, Zhiqun Deng

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)
8 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Egg and larval fish that drift downstream are likely to encounter river infrastructure and consequently rapid decompression, which may result in significant injury. Pressure-related injury (or barotrauma) has been shown in juvenile fishes when pressure falls sufficiently below that at which the fish has acclimated. There is a presumption that eggs and larvae may be at least as, if not more, susceptible to barotrauma injury because they are far less-developed and more fragile than juveniles, but studies to date report inconsistent results and none have considered the relationship between pressure change and barotrauma over a sufficiently broad range of pressure changes to enable tolerances to be properly determined. To address this, we exposed eggs and larvae of three physoclistic species to rapid decompression in a barometric chamber over a broad range of discrete pressure changes. Eggs, but not larvae, were unaffected by all levels of decompression tested. At exposure pressures below ?40 kPa, or ?40% of surface pressure, swim bladder deflation occurred in all species and internal haemorrhage was observed in one species. None of these injuries killed the fish within 24 h, but subsequent mortality cannot be excluded. Consequently, if larval drift is expected where river infrastructure is present, adopting design or operational features which maintain exposure pressures at 40% or more of the pressure to which drifting larvae are acclimated may afford greater protection for resident fishes.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)786-793
Number of pages8
JournalBiology Open
Volume5
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 15 Jun 2016

Fingerprint

Decompression
Fish
Ovum
Fishes
Pressure
fish
Barotrauma
Larva
Eggs
larvae
Wounds and Injuries
Rivers
infrastructure
deflation
rivers
swim bladder
hemorrhage
Urinary Bladder
Hemorrhage
Mortality

Cite this

@article{ade4afb1fdae4b43827e9f19ec31fa22,
title = "How low can they go when going with the flow? Tolerance of egg and larval fishes to rapid decompression",
abstract = "Egg and larval fish that drift downstream are likely to encounter river infrastructure and consequently rapid decompression, which may result in significant injury. Pressure-related injury (or barotrauma) has been shown in juvenile fishes when pressure falls sufficiently below that at which the fish has acclimated. There is a presumption that eggs and larvae may be at least as, if not more, susceptible to barotrauma injury because they are far less-developed and more fragile than juveniles, but studies to date report inconsistent results and none have considered the relationship between pressure change and barotrauma over a sufficiently broad range of pressure changes to enable tolerances to be properly determined. To address this, we exposed eggs and larvae of three physoclistic species to rapid decompression in a barometric chamber over a broad range of discrete pressure changes. Eggs, but not larvae, were unaffected by all levels of decompression tested. At exposure pressures below ?40 kPa, or ?40{\%} of surface pressure, swim bladder deflation occurred in all species and internal haemorrhage was observed in one species. None of these injuries killed the fish within 24 h, but subsequent mortality cannot be excluded. Consequently, if larval drift is expected where river infrastructure is present, adopting design or operational features which maintain exposure pressures at 40{\%} or more of the pressure to which drifting larvae are acclimated may afford greater protection for resident fishes.",
keywords = "Barotrauma, hydropower, larval drift, Murray-Darling basin, Physoclistous, Piecewise regression",
author = "Craig Boys and Wayne Robinson and Brett Miller and Brett Pflugrath and Lee Baumgartner and {Navarro Cuenca}, Anna and Richard Brown and Zhiqun Deng",
note = "Imported on 12 Apr 2017 - DigiTool details were: Journal title (773t) = Biology Open. ISSNs: 2046-6390;",
year = "2016",
month = "6",
day = "15",
doi = "10.1242/bio.017491",
language = "English",
volume = "5",
pages = "786--793",
journal = "Biology Open",
issn = "2046-6390",
publisher = "Company of Biologists Ltd",
number = "6",

}

How low can they go when going with the flow? Tolerance of egg and larval fishes to rapid decompression. / Boys, Craig; Robinson, Wayne; Miller, Brett; Pflugrath, Brett; Baumgartner, Lee; Navarro Cuenca, Anna; Brown, Richard; Deng, Zhiqun.

In: Biology Open, Vol. 5, No. 6, 15.06.2016, p. 786-793.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - How low can they go when going with the flow? Tolerance of egg and larval fishes to rapid decompression

AU - Boys, Craig

AU - Robinson, Wayne

AU - Miller, Brett

AU - Pflugrath, Brett

AU - Baumgartner, Lee

AU - Navarro Cuenca, Anna

AU - Brown, Richard

AU - Deng, Zhiqun

N1 - Imported on 12 Apr 2017 - DigiTool details were: Journal title (773t) = Biology Open. ISSNs: 2046-6390;

PY - 2016/6/15

Y1 - 2016/6/15

N2 - Egg and larval fish that drift downstream are likely to encounter river infrastructure and consequently rapid decompression, which may result in significant injury. Pressure-related injury (or barotrauma) has been shown in juvenile fishes when pressure falls sufficiently below that at which the fish has acclimated. There is a presumption that eggs and larvae may be at least as, if not more, susceptible to barotrauma injury because they are far less-developed and more fragile than juveniles, but studies to date report inconsistent results and none have considered the relationship between pressure change and barotrauma over a sufficiently broad range of pressure changes to enable tolerances to be properly determined. To address this, we exposed eggs and larvae of three physoclistic species to rapid decompression in a barometric chamber over a broad range of discrete pressure changes. Eggs, but not larvae, were unaffected by all levels of decompression tested. At exposure pressures below ?40 kPa, or ?40% of surface pressure, swim bladder deflation occurred in all species and internal haemorrhage was observed in one species. None of these injuries killed the fish within 24 h, but subsequent mortality cannot be excluded. Consequently, if larval drift is expected where river infrastructure is present, adopting design or operational features which maintain exposure pressures at 40% or more of the pressure to which drifting larvae are acclimated may afford greater protection for resident fishes.

AB - Egg and larval fish that drift downstream are likely to encounter river infrastructure and consequently rapid decompression, which may result in significant injury. Pressure-related injury (or barotrauma) has been shown in juvenile fishes when pressure falls sufficiently below that at which the fish has acclimated. There is a presumption that eggs and larvae may be at least as, if not more, susceptible to barotrauma injury because they are far less-developed and more fragile than juveniles, but studies to date report inconsistent results and none have considered the relationship between pressure change and barotrauma over a sufficiently broad range of pressure changes to enable tolerances to be properly determined. To address this, we exposed eggs and larvae of three physoclistic species to rapid decompression in a barometric chamber over a broad range of discrete pressure changes. Eggs, but not larvae, were unaffected by all levels of decompression tested. At exposure pressures below ?40 kPa, or ?40% of surface pressure, swim bladder deflation occurred in all species and internal haemorrhage was observed in one species. None of these injuries killed the fish within 24 h, but subsequent mortality cannot be excluded. Consequently, if larval drift is expected where river infrastructure is present, adopting design or operational features which maintain exposure pressures at 40% or more of the pressure to which drifting larvae are acclimated may afford greater protection for resident fishes.

KW - Barotrauma

KW - hydropower

KW - larval drift

KW - Murray-Darling basin

KW - Physoclistous

KW - Piecewise regression

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84978419577&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1242/bio.017491

DO - 10.1242/bio.017491

M3 - Article

VL - 5

SP - 786

EP - 793

JO - Biology Open

JF - Biology Open

SN - 2046-6390

IS - 6

ER -