Human disease from Chlamydia psittaci associated with equine foetal membranes and critically ill neonates: an example of a One Health approach to an emerging risk in a climate of poor diagnostic capacity and minimal funding

Jane Heller, C. Chicken, J. Carrick, Kris Hughes, A Polkinghorne, David Durrheim, K Taylor

Research output: Other contribution to conferenceAbstract

Abstract

Psittacosis is a severe systemic infectious disease in humans caused by Chlamydia psittaci. While birds are traditionally considered to be the source of C.psittaci, a cluster of five cases of severe respiratory illness that occurred in individuals exposed to equine foetal membranes in Australia signalled the potential for a novel route of infection. The objective of this work was to identify the significance of this putative route of transmission for human disease.
Materials and methods: A coordinated One Health approach, involving stakeholders in each sector, was used to explore the potential risk that equine products of abortion may pose to human health. A cross-disciplinary expert
advisory group led the work, which consisted of a retrospective cohort study in veterinary workers exposed to foetal membranes, an enhanced surveillance system tracing human contacts of equine chlamydiosis cases, and a pilot risk factor study of stud farms in a premier breeding region in Australia. This work was conducted within the context of limited numbers of cases, diagnostic capacity and external funding.
Results: A strong association was made between direct contact with equine foetal membranes and illness (OR= 11.77) in the retrospective cohort study, confirming the membranes as a source. The enhanced surveillance
system was successful in increasing awareness, but despite numerous equine events, did not identify any laboratory-confirmed human cases within the region studied. However, heightened surveillance identified another human cluster in another region associated with exposure to a clinically unwell equine neonate where psittacosis was PCR confirmed. Some management practices were identified to be positively associated with farm likelihood of equine cases: frequent manure removal, increased frequency of feed trough cleaning and bird
sightings at feed sheds.
Conclusion: Equine foetal membranes and critically unwell neonates represent an emerging threat for transmission of C.psittaci to humans.
Original languageEnglish
Pages98
Number of pages1
Publication statusPublished - 2018
Event15th International Symposium of Veterinary Epidemiology and Economics
- Chiang Mai, Thailand
Duration: 12 Nov 201816 Nov 2018

Conference

Conference15th International Symposium of Veterinary Epidemiology and Economics
CountryThailand
Period12/11/1816/11/18

Fingerprint

Chlamydophila psittaci
Extraembryonic Membranes
Climate
Critical Illness
Horses
Psittacosis
Cohort Studies
Retrospective Studies
Contact Tracing
Manure
Global Health
Practice Management
Birds
Breeding
Communicable Diseases
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Membranes

Cite this

Heller, J., Chicken, C., Carrick, J., Hughes, K., Polkinghorne, A., Durrheim, D., & Taylor, K. (2018). Human disease from Chlamydia psittaci associated with equine foetal membranes and critically ill neonates: an example of a One Health approach to an emerging risk in a climate of poor diagnostic capacity and minimal funding. 98. Abstract from 15th International Symposium of Veterinary Epidemiology and Economics
, Thailand.
Heller, Jane ; Chicken, C. ; Carrick, J. ; Hughes, Kris ; Polkinghorne, A ; Durrheim, David ; Taylor, K. / Human disease from Chlamydia psittaci associated with equine foetal membranes and critically ill neonates: an example of a One Health approach to an emerging risk in a climate of poor diagnostic capacity and minimal funding. Abstract from 15th International Symposium of Veterinary Epidemiology and Economics
, Thailand.1 p.
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title = "Human disease from Chlamydia psittaci associated with equine foetal membranes and critically ill neonates: an example of a One Health approach to an emerging risk in a climate of poor diagnostic capacity and minimal funding",
abstract = "Psittacosis is a severe systemic infectious disease in humans caused by Chlamydia psittaci. While birds are traditionally considered to be the source of C.psittaci, a cluster of five cases of severe respiratory illness that occurred in individuals exposed to equine foetal membranes in Australia signalled the potential for a novel route of infection. The objective of this work was to identify the significance of this putative route of transmission for human disease.Materials and methods: A coordinated One Health approach, involving stakeholders in each sector, was used to explore the potential risk that equine products of abortion may pose to human health. A cross-disciplinary expertadvisory group led the work, which consisted of a retrospective cohort study in veterinary workers exposed to foetal membranes, an enhanced surveillance system tracing human contacts of equine chlamydiosis cases, and a pilot risk factor study of stud farms in a premier breeding region in Australia. This work was conducted within the context of limited numbers of cases, diagnostic capacity and external funding.Results: A strong association was made between direct contact with equine foetal membranes and illness (OR= 11.77) in the retrospective cohort study, confirming the membranes as a source. The enhanced surveillancesystem was successful in increasing awareness, but despite numerous equine events, did not identify any laboratory-confirmed human cases within the region studied. However, heightened surveillance identified another human cluster in another region associated with exposure to a clinically unwell equine neonate where psittacosis was PCR confirmed. Some management practices were identified to be positively associated with farm likelihood of equine cases: frequent manure removal, increased frequency of feed trough cleaning and birdsightings at feed sheds.Conclusion: Equine foetal membranes and critically unwell neonates represent an emerging threat for transmission of C.psittaci to humans.",
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Heller, J, Chicken, C, Carrick, J, Hughes, K, Polkinghorne, A, Durrheim, D & Taylor, K 2018, 'Human disease from Chlamydia psittaci associated with equine foetal membranes and critically ill neonates: an example of a One Health approach to an emerging risk in a climate of poor diagnostic capacity and minimal funding' 15th International Symposium of Veterinary Epidemiology and Economics
, Thailand, 12/11/18 - 16/11/18, pp. 98.

Human disease from Chlamydia psittaci associated with equine foetal membranes and critically ill neonates: an example of a One Health approach to an emerging risk in a climate of poor diagnostic capacity and minimal funding. / Heller, Jane; Chicken, C.; Carrick, J.; Hughes, Kris; Polkinghorne, A; Durrheim, David; Taylor, K.

2018. 98 Abstract from 15th International Symposium of Veterinary Epidemiology and Economics
, Thailand.

Research output: Other contribution to conferenceAbstract

TY - CONF

T1 - Human disease from Chlamydia psittaci associated with equine foetal membranes and critically ill neonates: an example of a One Health approach to an emerging risk in a climate of poor diagnostic capacity and minimal funding

AU - Heller, Jane

AU - Chicken, C.

AU - Carrick, J.

AU - Hughes, Kris

AU - Polkinghorne, A

AU - Durrheim, David

AU - Taylor, K

PY - 2018

Y1 - 2018

N2 - Psittacosis is a severe systemic infectious disease in humans caused by Chlamydia psittaci. While birds are traditionally considered to be the source of C.psittaci, a cluster of five cases of severe respiratory illness that occurred in individuals exposed to equine foetal membranes in Australia signalled the potential for a novel route of infection. The objective of this work was to identify the significance of this putative route of transmission for human disease.Materials and methods: A coordinated One Health approach, involving stakeholders in each sector, was used to explore the potential risk that equine products of abortion may pose to human health. A cross-disciplinary expertadvisory group led the work, which consisted of a retrospective cohort study in veterinary workers exposed to foetal membranes, an enhanced surveillance system tracing human contacts of equine chlamydiosis cases, and a pilot risk factor study of stud farms in a premier breeding region in Australia. This work was conducted within the context of limited numbers of cases, diagnostic capacity and external funding.Results: A strong association was made between direct contact with equine foetal membranes and illness (OR= 11.77) in the retrospective cohort study, confirming the membranes as a source. The enhanced surveillancesystem was successful in increasing awareness, but despite numerous equine events, did not identify any laboratory-confirmed human cases within the region studied. However, heightened surveillance identified another human cluster in another region associated with exposure to a clinically unwell equine neonate where psittacosis was PCR confirmed. Some management practices were identified to be positively associated with farm likelihood of equine cases: frequent manure removal, increased frequency of feed trough cleaning and birdsightings at feed sheds.Conclusion: Equine foetal membranes and critically unwell neonates represent an emerging threat for transmission of C.psittaci to humans.

AB - Psittacosis is a severe systemic infectious disease in humans caused by Chlamydia psittaci. While birds are traditionally considered to be the source of C.psittaci, a cluster of five cases of severe respiratory illness that occurred in individuals exposed to equine foetal membranes in Australia signalled the potential for a novel route of infection. The objective of this work was to identify the significance of this putative route of transmission for human disease.Materials and methods: A coordinated One Health approach, involving stakeholders in each sector, was used to explore the potential risk that equine products of abortion may pose to human health. A cross-disciplinary expertadvisory group led the work, which consisted of a retrospective cohort study in veterinary workers exposed to foetal membranes, an enhanced surveillance system tracing human contacts of equine chlamydiosis cases, and a pilot risk factor study of stud farms in a premier breeding region in Australia. This work was conducted within the context of limited numbers of cases, diagnostic capacity and external funding.Results: A strong association was made between direct contact with equine foetal membranes and illness (OR= 11.77) in the retrospective cohort study, confirming the membranes as a source. The enhanced surveillancesystem was successful in increasing awareness, but despite numerous equine events, did not identify any laboratory-confirmed human cases within the region studied. However, heightened surveillance identified another human cluster in another region associated with exposure to a clinically unwell equine neonate where psittacosis was PCR confirmed. Some management practices were identified to be positively associated with farm likelihood of equine cases: frequent manure removal, increased frequency of feed trough cleaning and birdsightings at feed sheds.Conclusion: Equine foetal membranes and critically unwell neonates represent an emerging threat for transmission of C.psittaci to humans.

KW - Equine

KW - zoonosis

KW - One Health

M3 - Abstract

SP - 98

ER -