Human rights, police corruption and anti-corruption systems for police organisations

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    My concern in this article is with the nature and causes of police corruption and the methods used to combat it. However, I will argue that human and other moral rights are deeply implicated in police corruption and anti-corruption systems — not least because the fundamental institutional purpose of police organisations is to protect the human and other moral rights of citizens. The principal institutional anti-corruption vehicle is what is referred to as an integrity system. Accordingly, the matter resolves itself into designing an integrity system for police organisations that is sensitive to the fundamental purposes of policing, to the moral rights of victims of police corruption,and to the rights of police officers. I also discuss two key challenges faced in devising integrity systems for police organisations — namely, the reluctance of police officers to inform on their corrupt colleagues (the so-called ‘blue wall of silence’) and the quality of internal affairs investigations into police corruption.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)165-180
    Number of pages16
    JournalAustralian Journal of Human Rights
    Volume20
    Issue number2
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2014

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