I am not unskilled and unaware: Deaf and hearing learners’ self-assessments of linguistic and nonlinguistic skills

Dawn Walton, Georgianna Borgna, Marc Marschark, Kathryn Crowe, Jessica Trussell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The unskilled and unaware effect refers to the finding that individuals who are less knowledgeable or less skilled in a domain are relatively less able to evaluate their level of skill or effectively utilise feedback relative to individuals who are more skilled. Studies finding deaf students less accurate than hearing students in estimating their English vocabulary knowledge and in judging how much they are learning from material presented via sign language have attributed those results to the unskilled and unaware effect, citing the lack of language fluencies frequently demonstrated among deaf learners. The present study addressed the issue more directly by comparing both deaf and hearing individuals who were more and less skilled in four domains, three linguistic and one nonlinguistic. Results indicated that even individuals who are unskilled in a nonlinguistic domain can evaluate their performance when they are aware of what skilled performance would look like, and that unskilled and unaware effects can be influenced by individuals’ desires to be skilled.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)20-34
Number of pages15
JournalEuropean Journal of Special Needs Education
Volume34
Issue number1
Early online dateFeb 2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'I am not unskilled and unaware: Deaf and hearing learners’ self-assessments of linguistic and nonlinguistic skills'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this