"I didn't realise they knew so much": What pre-service teachers learn through interacting with students in classrooms

Christine Edwards-Groves, Noella Mackenzie

Research output: Book chapter/Published conference paperConference paperpeer-review

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Abstract

Research on what pre-service teachers learn through authentic experiences in classrooms is overwhelmingly dominated by reports on what they learn from listening to and interacting with supervising teachers. However, there is a dearth of research specifically describing what they learn through their interactions with students in the classrooms. This paper draws on a three year empirical
study conducted at a rural Australian university which investigated how learning teaching practice is not only informed but formed through interrogating the theory-practice nexus in enactment. A key finding was that by focusing critically on listening to and interacting with students within the intersubjective spaces of classrooms rather than on the act of teaching, pre-service teachers shifted
their perspectives on what teaching practice entails.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationAERA Online Paper Repository
PublisherAmerican Educational Research Association (AERA)
Pages1-7
Number of pages7
Edition2014
Publication statusPublished - 06 Apr 2014
EventAnnual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association (AERA): AERA 2014 - Pennsylvania Convention Center, Philadelphia, United States
Duration: 03 Apr 201407 Apr 2014
http://www.aera.net/Events-Meetings/Annual-Meeting/Previous-Annual-Meetings/2014-Annual-Meeting (Conference website)

Conference

ConferenceAnnual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association (AERA)
Abbreviated titleThe Power of Education Research for Innovation in Practice and Policy
Country/TerritoryUnited States
CityPhiladelphia
Period03/04/1407/04/14
Internet address

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