Ignorance, technology, and collective responsibility

Research output: Book chapter/Published conference paperChapter (peer-reviewed)

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Abstract

On the one hand, knowledge is a necessary condition, and perhaps a con­ stitutive feature, of technologies, such as communication and information technology, that contribute greatly to individual and collective well­being. Consider, for example, the Internet. So evidently technological knowledge is a good thing and ignorance of it a bad thing. On the other hand, some tech­nologies at least, e.g., nuclear technology, can be extremely harmful to indi­ viduals and collectives. Consider, for example, the atomic bombs dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. So, at least with respect to some technologies, evidently knowledge is a bad thing and ignorance a good thing. Accord­ ingly, the question arises as to whether we ought to aim at ignorance, rather than knowledge, of certain technologies and, if so, which technologies.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationPerspectives on ignorance from moral and social philosophy
EditorsRik Peels
Place of PublicationUnited States
PublisherTaylor & Francis
Chapter12
Pages217-237
Number of pages21
Edition1st
ISBN (Electronic)9781317369554, 9781315671246
ISBN (Print)9781138945661
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017

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Collective Responsibility
Ignorance
Nagasaki
World Wide Web
Hiroshima
Well-being
Atomic Bomb
Information and Communication Technology

Cite this

Miller, S. (2017). Ignorance, technology, and collective responsibility. In R. Peels (Ed.), Perspectives on ignorance from moral and social philosophy (1st ed., pp. 217-237). United States: Taylor & Francis. https://doi.org/10.4324/9781315671246
Miller, Seumas. / Ignorance, technology, and collective responsibility. Perspectives on ignorance from moral and social philosophy. editor / Rik Peels. 1st. ed. United States : Taylor & Francis, 2017. pp. 217-237
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Miller, S 2017, Ignorance, technology, and collective responsibility. in R Peels (ed.), Perspectives on ignorance from moral and social philosophy. 1st edn, Taylor & Francis, United States, pp. 217-237. https://doi.org/10.4324/9781315671246

Ignorance, technology, and collective responsibility. / Miller, Seumas.

Perspectives on ignorance from moral and social philosophy. ed. / Rik Peels. 1st. ed. United States : Taylor & Francis, 2017. p. 217-237.

Research output: Book chapter/Published conference paperChapter (peer-reviewed)

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Miller S. Ignorance, technology, and collective responsibility. In Peels R, editor, Perspectives on ignorance from moral and social philosophy. 1st ed. United States: Taylor & Francis. 2017. p. 217-237 https://doi.org/10.4324/9781315671246